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Sep 7, 2020

The Air Force Just Tested “Robot Dogs” For Use In Base Security

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, security

The quadrupedal robots secured the perimeter of a base during a recent test of the USAF’s Advanced Battle Management System.

Sep 7, 2020

Scientists target Hep C virus using CRISPR-Cas technology

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Scientists in the US have used the CRISPR-Cas system to target the RNA of hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Sep 7, 2020

Why Do Cambrian Creatures Look So Weird?

Posted by in category: futurism

These creatures look downright bizarre by today’s standards.

Sep 7, 2020

Scientists Detected a New Kind of Black Hole Being Born in a Bizarre Event

Posted by in category: cosmology

A merger with a black hole possessing an unexplained ‘forbidden mass’ created the first conclusive example of an intermediate black hole in the most massive merger ever detected using ripples in spacetime.

Sep 7, 2020

New Species Found in the Hottest Place on Earth

Posted by in category: futurism

Shrimps are tough: 3.


A new species of freshwater Crustacea has been discovered during an expedition of the desert Lut, known as the hottest place on Earth.

The newly identified species belongs to the genus Phallocryptus of which only four species were previously known from different arid and semiarid regions.

Continue reading “New Species Found in the Hottest Place on Earth” »

Sep 7, 2020

Adam Savage Builds Working IRON MAN Suit That Flies

Posted by in category: futurism

If anyone in the world had the actual real-life know-how of Tony Stark, it’d be Adam Savage. He proved this by building a working, flying Iron Man suit.

Sep 7, 2020

Time for a new contender in energy conversion and storage

Posted by in categories: energy, materials

Evolutionary search has helped scientists predict the lowest energy structure of a two-dimensional (2-D) material, B2P6, with some remarkable features, including structural anisotropy and Janus geometry.

Janus materials—named after the two-faced Greek god of duality—have two surfaces with distinct physical properties. As such, they offer unique benefits, such as high solar-to-hydrogen efficiency.

Anisotropic materials exhibit different properties when measured along different directions. In the case of B2P6, the ionic diffusion is strongly anisotropic, a feature that can be potentially useful in affordable energy storage solutions, such as metal-ion batteries.

Sep 7, 2020

Domino’s First Company To Deliver Pizza By Drone | CNBC

Posted by in category: drones

Sep 7, 2020

Making X-Rays From Tape! 🤯

Posted by in category: futurism

Making X-Rays From Tape! 🤯

Sep 7, 2020

Hubble Eyes a Colorful Pocket of Stars – Orbiting Closely, Like Bees Swarming Around a Hive

Posted by in category: space

Many colorful stars are packed close together in this image of the globular cluster NGC 1805, taken by the NASA /ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This tight grouping of thousands of stars is located near the edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our own Milky Way. The stars orbit closely to one another, like bees swarming around a hive. In the dense center of one of these clusters, stars are 100 to 1000 times closer together than the nearest stars are to our Sun, making planetary systems around them unlikely.

The striking difference in star colors is illustrated beautifully in this image, which combines two different types of light: blue stars, shining brightest in near-ultraviolet light, and red stars, illuminated in red and near-infrared. Space telescopes like Hubble can observe in the ultraviolet because they are positioned above Earth’s atmosphere, which absorbs most of this wavelength, making it inaccessible to ground-based facilities.

This young globular cluster can be seen from the southern hemisphere, in the Dorado constellation, which is Portugese for dolphinfish. Usually, globular clusters contain stars which are born at the same time; however, NGC 1805 is unusual as it appears to host two different populations of stars with ages millions of years apart. Observing such clusters of stars can help astronomers understand how stars evolve, and what factors determine whether they end their lives as white dwarfs, or explode as supernovae.