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Archive for the ‘nuclear energy’ category

Mar 27, 2020

Physicists discover how to make a second Sun, unlimited energy soon?

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, physics

Physicists have attempted a new way of controlling nuclear fusion and it has worked.

Mar 22, 2020

Scientists Call for Fusion Power Plant in the United States

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

Long Haul

There’s a lot that needs to happen before that pilot fusion plant gets built — if scientists had already conquered the challenges of practical nuclear fusion then the report wouldn’t have been necessary.

“This is the first time in a generation when the fusion community has been called upon to self-organize and figure out its highest priorities for getting from fusion science to fusion energy,” Bob Mungaard, CEO of Commonwealth Fusion Systems, said in the release. “How we can get ready, with data, experience, test facilities — the things that are needed to support the science, and eventually an industry.”

Mar 21, 2020

Cold plasma nuclear fusion method

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, physics

[en] In order to continue cold nuclear fusion reaction reliably and easily, gases of deuterium or deuterium compounds are introduced to a plasma reaction vessel and electric energy is applied to convert the gases into plasmas. Further, deuterium ions are attracted to the surface of materials which cause nuclear fusion by an electric field which is negatively self-biased or externally biased. Atomic deuterium collides against the surface of a cathode on the side of palladium to cause nuclear fusion reaction at the surface or the vicinity of the inside of the cathode. Since a metal absorbing a great amount of deuterium is used as the material for the cathode in order to improve the efficiency and the absorption is increased at a low temperature, the cathode is cooled by liquid hydrogen. Further, the deuterium is introduced in the form of blowing so as to increase the absorption of the deuterium. When the scale is increased by 10 to 1000 times, practical fusion reaction can be caused to utilize as a controllable energy source which can provide a remarkable industrial effect. (N.H.)

Primary Subject

NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS (A3411)

Mar 20, 2020

Magnetars are the most powerful magnets in the universe

Posted by in categories: cosmology, nuclear energy

:ooooo These could make great fusion devices.


Magnetars are the bizarre super-dense remnants of supernova explosions and the strongest magnets known in the universe.

Mar 15, 2020

Fusion Energy Solution May Come From Permanent Magnets Like Those on Refrigerator Doors – But Far Stronger

Posted by in categories: food, nuclear energy, physics, space

Permanent magnets akin to those used on refrigerators could speed the development of fusion energy – the same energy produced by the sun and stars.

In principle, such magnets can greatly simplify the design and production of twisty fusion facilities called stellarators, according to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald, Germany. PPPL founder Lyman Spitzer Jr. invented the stellarator in the early 1950s.

Most stellarators use a set of complex twisted coils that spiral like stripes on a candy cane to produce magnetic fields that shape and control the plasma that fuels fusion reactions. Refrigerator-like permanent magnets could produce the hard part of these essential fields, the researchers say, allowing simple, non-twisted coils to produce the remaining part in place of the complex coils.

Continue reading “Fusion Energy Solution May Come From Permanent Magnets Like Those on Refrigerator Doors – But Far Stronger” »

Mar 15, 2020

Hydrogen: The Secret To Commercializing Nuclear Fusion

Posted by in categories: innovation, nuclear energy

:00000


There’s a new breakthrough that might just be the secret ingredient to commercialize “the holy grail of energy,” nuclear fusion.

Mar 14, 2020

Nuclear diagnostics help pave way to ignition on NIF inertial confinement fusion

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

At its peak, a NIF inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion lasts about 100 trillionths of a second. The imploded fuel is a hundred millionths of a meter in diameter and as much as eight times denser than lead. The center of the imploded capsule is a few times hotter than the core of the sun.

Developing a clear understanding of exactly what’s happening in a NIF implosion under those extreme conditions is one of the biggest challenges researchers face as they work toward achieving fusion ignition on the world’s largest and highest-energy laser system.

To help meet that challenge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and its partner laboratories and universities have designed and built an extensive suite of more than a dozen nuclear diagnostics, with more on the way.

Mar 12, 2020

Permanent magnets stronger than those on refrigerator could be a solution for delivering fusion energy

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, physics, space

Permanent magnets akin to those used on refrigerators could speed the development of fusion energy—the same energy produced by the sun and stars.

In principle, such magnets can greatly simplify the design and production of twisty fusion facilities called stellarators, according to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald, Germany. PPPL founder Lyman Spitzer Jr. invented the in the early 1950s.

Most stellarators use a set of complex twisted coils that spiral like stripes on a candy cane to produce magnetic fields that shape and control the plasma that fuels fusion reactions. Refrigerator-like could produce the hard part of these essential fields, the researchers say, allowing simple, non-twisted coils to produce the remaining part in place of the complex coils.

Mar 10, 2020

Confirmed: Lightning Causes Nuclear Reactions in the Sky

Posted by in categories: climatology, nuclear energy, particle physics

Circa 2017 o.o


Lightning is nuts. It’s a supercharged bolt of electricity extending from the sky to the ground that can kill people. But it can also produce nuclear reactions, according to new research.

Scientists have long known that thunderstorms can produce high-energy radiation, like this one from December, 2015 that blasted a Japanese beach town with some gamma radiation. But now, another team of researchers in Japan are reporting conclusive evidence of these gamma rays setting off atom-altering reactions like those in a nuclear reactor.

Continue reading “Confirmed: Lightning Causes Nuclear Reactions in the Sky” »

Mar 7, 2020

MIT takes a page from Tony Stark, edges closer to an ARC fusion reactor (+video)

Posted by in categories: education, nuclear energy

O.o circa 2016.


MIT has been developing a small fusion reactor prototype, three of which could power the City of Boston if they were fully built. Though the project lost federal funding for its current fusion device, the school plans to press ahead on building a new, more advanced prototype.

Continue reading “MIT takes a page from Tony Stark, edges closer to an ARC fusion reactor (+video)” »

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