Blog

Archive for the ‘genetics’ category

Sep 16, 2019

Meet Five Synthetic Biology Companies Using AI To Engineer Biology

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, genetics, robotics/AI

TVs and radios blare that “artificial intelligence is coming,” and it will take your job and beat you at chess.

But AI is already here, and it can beat you — and the world’s best — at chess. In 2012, it was also used by Google to identify cats in YouTube videos. Today, it’s the reason Teslas have Autopilot and Netflix and Spotify seem to “read your mind.” Now, AI is changing the field of synthetic biology and how we engineer biology. It’s helping engineers design new ways to design genetic circuits — and it could leave a remarkable impact on the future of humanity through the huge investment it has been receiving ($12.3b in the last 10 years) and the markets it is disrupting.

Sep 16, 2019

Gene-Hacking Mosquitoes to Be Infertile Backfired Spectacularly

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

On its surface, the plan was simple: gene-hack mosquitoes so their offspring immediately die, mix them with disease-spreading bugs in the wild, and watch the population drop off. Unfortunately, that didn’t quite pan out.

The genetically-altered mosquitoes did mix with the wild population, and for a brief period the number of mosquitoes in Jacobino, Brazil did plummet, according to research published in Nature Scientific Reports last week. But 18 months later the population bounced right back up, New Atlas reports — and even worse, the new genetic hybrids may be even more resilient to future attempts to quell their numbers.

Sep 16, 2019

Death is Inevitable but Aging is Not

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, genetics, life extension

Age is not the definitive factor it’s made out to be when it comes to our health. We can use our age as a baseline for tracking our health and longevity, but it isn’t stagnant. For example, certain types of testing can help us compare our biological age to our calendar age in order to tinker with our wellness routine and achieve the milestones we’re after. With the right steps, we can slow down and even sometimes reverse the aging process.

When it comes to our biological age, or the measure of how well our body is actually functioning for whatever life stage we are in, there are many things that impact it. Diet, lifestyle patterns like exercise and sleep, and stress are all involved in forming our biological age, along with many other factors like blood sugar, inflammation, and genetics. This week on The Doctor’s Farmacy, I’m joined by Dr. David Sinclair to explore the topic of longevity and anti-aging and how he reduced his own internal age by more than 20 years. Dr. Sinclair is a professor in the Department of Genetics and co-director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School, where he and his colleagues study longevity, aging, and how to slow its effects.

Continue reading “Death is Inevitable but Aging is Not” »

Sep 16, 2019

Research suggests new approach for treating inflammation

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Medications that mitigate inflammation caused by a variety of diseases including rheumatic arthritis may also compromise a person’s immune system, but a new approach points to a possible solution to this problem.

Researchers have discovered a mechanism that might alleviate inflammation by suppressing the of a type of white blood cells called neutrophils. The cells migrate within tissues in order to kill pathogens but may also cause excessive inflammation, resulting in tissue injury and other adverse effects.

The scientists identified a genetic molecule called miR-199, a type of “microRNA,” which reduces the migration of neutrophils, therefore potentially relieving inflammation without compromising the immune system.

Sep 16, 2019

By exploiting a feature of the immune system, researchers open the door for stem cell transplants to repair the brain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed a way to successfully transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs.

A report on the research, published Sept. 16 in the journal Brain, details the new approach, which selectively circumvents the against foreign cells, allowing transplanted cells to survive, thrive and protect long after stopping immune-suppressing drugs.

The ability to successfully transplant healthy cells into the without the need for conventional anti-rejection drugs could advance the search for therapies that help children born with a rare but devastating class of genetic diseases in which myelin, the protective coating around neurons that helps them send messages, does not form normally. Approximately 1 of every 100,000 children born in the U.S. will have one of these diseases, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. This disorder is characterized by infants missing developmental milestones such as sitting and walking, having involuntary muscle spasms, and potentially experiencing partial paralysis of the arms and legs, all caused by a genetic mutation in the genes that form myelin.

Sep 13, 2019

The new genetics of intelligence

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Recent genome-wide association studies have catapulted the search for genes underlying human intelligence into a new era. Genome-wide polygenic scores promise to transform research on individual differences in intelligence, but not without societal and ethical implications, as the authors discuss in this Review.

Sep 13, 2019

More than 500 Intelligence Genes Discovered

Posted by in categories: economics, education, genetics

Are humans born with “intelligence” genes, or is human intelligence determined by environmental factors, such as economic status or easy access to education?

When a team of researchers set out to answer this question, they discovered that more than 500 genes were associated with intelligence. The results, published in Nature Genetics, indicate that intelligence is much more complex than previously thought.

Continue reading “More than 500 Intelligence Genes Discovered” »

Sep 13, 2019

Morgan Levine at Ending Age-Related Diseases 2019

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, life extension

Today, we’re offering another talk from Ending Age-Related Diseases 2019, our highly successful two-day conference that featured talks from leading researchers and investors, bringing them together to discuss the future of aging and rejuvenation biotechnology.

In her talk, Morgan Levine of the Yale School of Medicine discussed epigenetic biomarkers in detail, discussing the ways in which co-methylation networks provide insight into senescent cells and other facets of biological age.

Sep 13, 2019

Prof. Dr. Collin Ewald — ETH Zürich — Extracellular Matrix and Healthy Aging — IdeaXme Show — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, biological, biotech/medical, cryonics, DNA, genetics, health, life extension, neuroscience, science

Sep 12, 2019

Scientists are racing to reengineer the banana before it’s gone forever

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, genetics

A deadly fungus is spreading through banana plantations, and the cloned bananas we eat are defenseless. In labs around the world, scientists are trying to find ways to genetically alter the fruit to make it resistant.

[Images: Rawpixel]

Page 1 of 15912345678Last