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Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category

Nov 16, 2019

New cell therapy improves memory and stops seizures following TBI

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Transplanting embryonic progenitor interneurons into the hippocampus of mouse models of TBI, researchers noticed the neurons migrated to the injury site and made new connections. Following treatment, memory improved and seizures were reduced.

Nov 16, 2019

[FREE] Watch the Groundbreaking 8-Part Docu-series, ‘The Gut Solution’ (Starts July 1st)

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Did you know that obesity, autoimmune disease, diabetes, arthritis, depression, anxiety and eczema all have one thing in common? It’s the gut.

Nov 16, 2019

Sleep deprivation makes you crave sugar

Posted by in category: neuroscience

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Nov 16, 2019

Discovered: the brain’s map pins

Posted by in category: neuroscience

New finding sheds new light on how the brain processes spatial memory.

Nov 16, 2019

Link between inflammation and mental sluggishness shown

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Summary: Inflammation appears to have a negative impact on attention and cognition. Source: University of BirminghamScientists at the University of Birmingham in collaboration with the Universi.

Nov 15, 2019

Nutritional psychiatry: Your brain on food

Posted by in categories: food, neuroscience

Think about it. Your brain is always “on.” It takes care of your thoughts and movements, your breathing and heartbeat, your senses — it works hard 24/7, even while you’re asleep. This means your brain requires a constant supply of fuel. That “fuel” comes from the foods you eat — and what’s in that fuel makes all the difference. Put simply, what you eat directly affects the structure and function of your brain and, ultimately, your mood.

Like an expensive car, your brain functions best when it gets only premium fuel. Eating high-quality foods that contain lots of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants nourishes the brain and protects it from oxidative stress — the “waste” (free radicals) produced when the body uses oxygen, which can damage cells.

Unfortunately, just like an expensive car, your brain can be damaged if you ingest anything other than premium fuel. If substances from “low-premium” fuel (such as what you get from processed or refined foods) get to the brain, it has little ability to get rid of them. Diets high in refined sugars, for example, are harmful to the brain. In addition to worsening your body’s regulation of insulin, they also promote inflammation and oxidative stress. Multiple studies have found a correlation between a diet high in refined sugars and impaired brain function — and even a worsening of symptoms of mood disorders, such as depression.

Nov 15, 2019

Bacteria in the gut may alter aging process, study finds

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, life extension, neuroscience

This could be happening to me.


An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the aging process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down.

All , including human beings, coexist with a myriad of microbial species living in and on them, and research conducted over the last 20 years has established their important role in nutrition, physiology, metabolism and behavior.

Continue reading “Bacteria in the gut may alter aging process, study finds” »

Nov 15, 2019

Mayo Clinic Marketplace

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that can result in hallucinations, delusions, and extremely disordered thinking and behavior.

Nov 15, 2019

Scientists Have Discovered a Multidimensional Universe Inside the Brain

Posted by in category: neuroscience

An exciting discovery has been made by scientists as they have uncovered that the human brain contains structures and shapes that may have up to eleven dimensions.

Nov 14, 2019

Bacteria in the gut may alter aging process

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Summary: Transplanting gut microbiota from older mice to younger germ-free mice increased hippocampal neurogenesis and intestinal growth. Source: Nanyang Technological UniversityAn internationa.

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