Blog

Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category

Sep 18, 2019

Traumatic Brain Injury Causes Intestinal Damage

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Researchers have identified a link between traumatic brain injury and intestinal changes. A new study reports the intestinal changes may contribute to increased risk of developing infections and could worsen brain damage in TBI patients.

Sep 18, 2019

The Heterogeneity of Senescent Cells

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, life extension, neuroscience

Cellular senescence, discovered in 1961 by Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead, is a state in which cells no longer perform their functions, instead emitting harmful chemicals that turn other cells senescent. Senescence is primarily caused by telomere shortening and DNA damage, and senescent cells are known to contribute to multiple diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and dementia.

One method of removing senescent cells is caloric restriction, which is a temporary reduction of food calories. This has been shown to be one of the most effective methods to decrease and slow the onset of aging phenotypes [1].

This is related to autophagy, which is the cell’s natural method of breaking down parts of itself when it doesn’t have immediate access to food [2]. Autophagy has been shown to both promote and prevent senescence. It removes damaged macromolecules or organelles, such as mitochondria, which would otherwise cause cellular senescence. However, some of the processes that cause autophagy cause cellular senescence as well [3].

Sep 17, 2019

Simple eye exam may detect Alzheimer’s disease early

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

A noninvasive eye exam may one day be able to screen for Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms appear.

Sep 16, 2019

Johns Hopkins Breakthrough Opens the Door for Stem Cell Transplants to Repair the Brain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Transplanted brain stem cells survive without anti-rejection drugs in mice. By exploiting a feature of the immune system, researchers open the door for stem cell transplants to repair the brain.

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed a way to successfully transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs.

A report on the research, published today (September 16, 2019) in the journal Brain, details the new approach, which selectively circumvents the immune response against foreign cells, allowing transplanted cells to survive, thrive and protect brain tissue long after stopping immune-suppressing drugs.

Sep 16, 2019

By exploiting a feature of the immune system, researchers open the door for stem cell transplants to repair the brain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed a way to successfully transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs.

A report on the research, published Sept. 16 in the journal Brain, details the new approach, which selectively circumvents the against foreign cells, allowing transplanted cells to survive, thrive and protect long after stopping immune-suppressing drugs.

The ability to successfully transplant healthy cells into the without the need for conventional anti-rejection drugs could advance the search for therapies that help children born with a rare but devastating class of genetic diseases in which myelin, the protective coating around neurons that helps them send messages, does not form normally. Approximately 1 of every 100,000 children born in the U.S. will have one of these diseases, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. This disorder is characterized by infants missing developmental milestones such as sitting and walking, having involuntary muscle spasms, and potentially experiencing partial paralysis of the arms and legs, all caused by a genetic mutation in the genes that form myelin.

Sep 15, 2019

Lab chemists and computer scientists are joining forces to find a nerve-agent antidote that will go where today’s antidotes can’t go – the brain

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

Lab chemists and computer scientists are joining forces to find a nerve-agent antidote that will go where today €™s antidotes can €™t go €“ the brain. Read more about in the latest issue of our Science & Technology Review magazine †’ https://str.llnl.gov/2019-06/valdez

Sep 15, 2019

Brain-computer interface: huge potential benefits and formidable challenges

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

A new Royal Society report called “iHuman: blurring lines between mind and machine” is for the first time systematically exploring whether it is “right” or not to use neural interfaces – machines implanted in or worn over the body to pick up or stimulate nervous activity in the brain or other parts of the nervous system. It also sets out recommendations to ensure the ethical risks are understood, and to set up a transparent, public-driven but flexible regulatory framework which will allow the UK to lead innovative technology in this field.

Neural interfaces, brain-computer interfaces and other devices that blur the lines between mind and machine have extraordinary potential. Image Credit: Iaremenko Sergii / Shutterstock

Sep 15, 2019

Compound Created to Help Reconstruct Myelin in Multiple Sclerosis

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Another magical flavonoid!


Researchers have created a compound, that when tested in mice, was able to promote the reconstruction of the myelin sheath surrounding neuronal axons. These findings could pave the way to a new treatment for combating demyelinating conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The findings were published in Glia. “I think we’ll know in about a year if this is the exact right drug to try in human clinical trials,” explained senior study author Larry Sherman, Ph.D., in a recent press release.

“If it’s not, we know from the mouse studies that this approach can work. The question is, can this drug be adapted to bigger human brains?”

Continue reading “Compound Created to Help Reconstruct Myelin in Multiple Sclerosis” »

Sep 15, 2019

Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality | Anil Seth

Posted by in categories: business, neuroscience

Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience — and not just any conscious experience, your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it. How does this happen? According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we’re all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it “reality.” Join Seth for a delightfully disorienting talk that may leave you questioning the very nature of your existence.

Check out more TED talks: http://www.ted.com

Continue reading “Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality | Anil Seth” »

Sep 14, 2019

Mathematician reveals the brain exercises that help prevent memory loss

Posted by in categories: habitats, neuroscience

A mathematician has shared some of the brain exercises he uses to help people with dementia.

Gareth Rowlands, from St Albans, runs memory workshops at dementia cafes and care homes in Hertfordshire.

He became passionate about helping those with memory loss after he visited a care home which he wife ran in Barnet.

Page 1 of 29312345678Last