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Sep 19, 2022

The Internet will be 90% AI-generated content by 2026, claim experts

Posted by in categories: internet, law enforcement, robotics/AI

According to a report by AI experts, the internet is set to be overrun by AI-generated content in just a few years. Will this ruin content for the rest of time?

A study by Europol, The European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation, claims that AI will be more prominent than human-made content very soon. The study explains that the vast expansion of AI tools means that we’ll have to deal with more AI-generated content than human-made content.

In the report, it’s claimed that humanity will be flooded with “synthetic media”. This is a new term for media that is fully generated by artificial intelligence programs, fuelled by bots designed to pump out as much content as possible.

Sep 15, 2022

1 person injured at Northeastern University after package detonated on Boston campus, officials say

Posted by in categories: law enforcement, virtual reality

They dislike virtual reality development.

Quote:

“Several federal law enforcement sources told CNN the package contained a rambling note that criticized Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and the relationship between academic institutions and the developers of virtual reality.”

Continue reading “1 person injured at Northeastern University after package detonated on Boston campus, officials say” »

Aug 31, 2022

Leaked Docs Show Spyware Firm Offering iOS, Android Hacking Services for $8 Million

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, law enforcement, robotics/AI

Leaked documents appear to show a little-known spyware company offering services that include Android and iOS device exploits for €8 million (roughly $8 million).

Exploit brokers and mercenary spyware providers have been in the spotlight recently, mainly due to revelations surrounding the use of the controversial Pegasus solution of Israeli company NSO Group.

One of NSO’s fairly new competitors is Intellexa, a company founded by Israeli entrepreneur Tal Dilian. The company claims on its website that it’s offering technologies that empower law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ‘help protect communities’. The company says it’s based in the EU and regulated, with six sites and R&D labs in Europe.

Continue reading “Leaked Docs Show Spyware Firm Offering iOS, Android Hacking Services for $8 Million” »

Aug 30, 2022

FBI: Hackers increasingly exploit DeFi bugs to steal cryptocurrency

Posted by in categories: cryptocurrencies, finance, internet, law enforcement, security

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is warning investors that cybercriminals are increasingly exploiting security vulnerabilities in Decentralized Finance (DeFi) platforms to steal cryptocurrency.

“The FBI has observed cyber criminals exploiting vulnerabilities in the smart contracts governing DeFi platforms to steal investors’ cryptocurrency,” the federal law enforcement agency said.

“The FBI encourages investors who suspect cyber criminals have stolen their DeFi investments to contact the FBI via the Internet Crime Complaint Center or their local FBI field office.”

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Aug 24, 2022

New research on the risks of lead exposure from bullets used in big game hunting

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, law enforcement

The lead in some bullets used for hunting deer, moose, and elk is toxic to the humans who eat the harvested meat and to scavenger animals that feast on remains left in the field.

A team of researchers from the Canadian Light Source at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and the College of Medicine at USask has for the first time used synchrotron imaging to study both the size and spread of bullet fragments in big game shot by hunters. Their findings were published today in PLOS ONE.

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Jul 20, 2022

The FBI Forced A Suspect To Unlock Amazon’s Encrypted App Wickr With Their Face

Posted by in categories: encryption, government, law enforcement, mobile phones, privacy

In November last year, an undercover agent with the FBI was inside a group on Amazon-owned messaging app Wickr, with a name referencing young girls. The group was devoted to sharing child sexual abuse material (CSAM) within the protection of the encrypted app, which is also used by the U.S. government, journalists and activists for private communications. Encryption makes it almost impossible for law enforcement to intercept messages sent over Wickr, but this agent had found a way to infiltrate the chat, where they could start piecing together who was sharing the material.

As part of the investigation into the members of this Wickr group, the FBI used a previously unreported search warrant method to force one member to unlock the encrypted messaging app using his face. The FBI has previously forced users to unlock an iPhone with Face ID, but this search warrant, obtained by Forbes, represents the first known public record of a U.S. law enforcement agency getting a judge’s permission to unlock an encrypted messaging app with someone’s biometrics.

According to the warrant, the FBI first tracked down the suspect by sending a request for information, via an unnamed foreign law enforcement partner, to the cloud storage provider hosting the illegal images. That gave them the Gmail address the FBI said belonged to Christopher Terry, a 53-year-old Knoxville, Tennessee resident, who had prior convictions for possession of child exploitation material. It also provided IP addresses used to create the links to the CSAM. From there, investigators asked Google and Comcast via administrative subpoenas (data requests that don’t have the same level of legal requirements as search warrants) for more identifying information that helped them track down Terry and raid his home.

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Jun 26, 2022

Google Insider Says Company’s AI Could “Escape Control” and “Do Bad Things”

Posted by in categories: law enforcement, policy, robotics/AI

Suspended Google engineer Blake Lemoine made a big splash earlier this month, claiming that the company’s LaMDA chatbot had become sentient.

The AI researcher, who was put on administrative leave by the tech giant for violating its confidentiality policy, according to the Washington Post, decided to help LaMDA find a lawyer — who was later “scared off” the case, as Lemoine told Futurism on Wednesday.

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Jun 12, 2022

Fearing lawsuits, factories rush to replace humans with robots in South Korea

Posted by in categories: law enforcement, robotics/AI

“Throughout our history, we’ve always had to find ways to stay ahead,” Kim told Rest of World. “Automation is the next step in that process.”

Speefox’s factory is 75% automated, representing South Korea’s continued push away from human labor. Part of that drive is labor costs: South Korea’s minimum wage has climbed, rising 5% just this year.

But the most recent impetus is legal liability for worker death or injury. In January, a law came into effect called the Serious Disasters Punishment Act, which says, effectively, that if workers die or sustain serious injuries on the job, and courts determine that the company neglected safety standards, the CEO or high-ranking managers could be fined or go to prison.

Jun 1, 2022

Instagram puts Amber Alerts in your feed to help find abducted children

Posted by in categories: electronics, law enforcement

Amber Alerts are an important tool in helping locate abducted children. They’re authorized by law enforcement and broadcast via TVs, text messages, and other means. Now, Instagram will also push Amber Alerts into users’ feeds with the feature rolling out in the US today and set to be available in 25 total countries “in the next couple of weeks.” It shows how apps like Instagram have become basic communication infrastructure in the modern world.

Adding Amber Alerts to Instagram makes sense for a few reasons. First, younger generations may well ignore text messages but scroll through Instagram with some regularity. Second, while text alerts require people to click a link to get more information and photos of the missing child, Instagram’s alerts will include this info directly. It doesn’t seem the alerts will be issued as notifications — they’ll just appear in users’ regular feeds.

May 11, 2022

Researchers testing light technology that could protect against the next pandemic

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, law enforcement

New technology could add another layer of protection against the next pandemic by simply turning on a light. Researchers are exploring a new way of using ultraviolet light to make indoor air safer.

“It’s been known for 80 years or so that ultraviolet light can kill bacteria and inactivate viruses in the air so that they’re no longer infectious,” Don K. Milton, professor of occupational and environmental health at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, told CBS News.

Conventional UV-C light has been used extensively in places like hospitals, homeless shelters and prisons. But that conventional UV light can damage the skin and eye, so should not be shined directly at people.

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