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Archive for the ‘futurism’ category

Jan 25, 2020

MIT’s new GPS system uses satellite images to put you in the right lane

Posted by in category: futurism

The system could bring detailed GPS maps to otherwise under-served areas.

Jan 24, 2020

People can now be identified at a distance

Posted by in category: futurism

And then dealt with, if they are enemy operatives.

Science and technology Jan 23rd 2020 edition.

Jan 24, 2020

Another coronavirus case has been confirmed in the U.S., this time in Chicago

Posted by in category: futurism

2nd new coronavirus case confirmed in the USA, CDC reports. What are the symptoms of coronavirus and what is it? The most recent coronavirus diagnosis.

Jan 24, 2020

‘Ghost’ population of humans discovered in ancient Africa

Posted by in category: futurism

Ancient burials in a Cameroon rock shelter are shedding light on the humans who lived in western Central Africa thousands of years ago.

Jan 24, 2020

Cashless bans could hinder Amazon Go expansion

Posted by in category: futurism

San Francisco is weighing a ban on cash-free stores in an effort to protect low-income shoppers, while Philadelphia and New Jersey recently passed laws.

Jan 24, 2020

These Lab-Grown Snake Organoids Produce Real Venom

Posted by in category: futurism

Oozing with poison and small enough to fit in a petri dish, the organoids could one day help provide sorely-needed antivenoms.

Jan 24, 2020

China Quarantines Three More Entire Cities to Fight Pandemic

Posted by in category: futurism

20 million residents are in lockdown.

Jan 24, 2020

Group membership dictates the neural correlates of social optimism biases

Posted by in categories: futurism, neuroscience

Optimism bias, i.e. expecting the future to hold more desirable than undesirable outcomes, also extends to people that we like or admire. However, it remains unknown how the brain generates this social optimism bias. In this study, respondents estimated the likelihood of future desirable and undesirable outcomes for an in-group and three out-groups: warm-incompetent, cold-competent, and cold-incompetent. We found a strong social optimism bias for the in-group and the warm out-group and an inverted pattern for the cold-incompetent out-group. For all groups, scores of social optimism bias correlated with the brain activity in structures that respondents differentially engaged depending on the target social group. In line with our hypotheses, evaluating the in-group recruited the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, whereas evaluating the warm out-group engaged the posterior insula, mid cingulate cortex, and somatosensory cortices. These findings suggest different underlying cognitive mechanisms of social optimism bias for these groups, despite similar behavioural patterns. Thinking about the cold out-groups recruited the right anterior temporal lobe, and temporoparietal junction. Evaluating the cold-incompetent out-group additionally recruited the anterior insula, inferior frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal cortex. We discuss these neuroimaging findings with respect to their putative cognitive functions.

Jan 23, 2020

Neanderthals may have climbed an active volcano soon after it erupted

Posted by in category: futurism

Footprints on an extinct Italian volcano suggest ancient humans were regular visitors, and the shapes of the tracks point to the identity of the trackmakers.

Jan 23, 2020

A Totally Unexpected Behavior of Water Has Been Discovered

Posted by in category: futurism

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