Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘innovation’ category

Jul 4, 2020

Results of an Experiment

Posted by in categories: chemistry, innovation

A USC Dornsife chemistry professor’s bet on a student proposal leads to new understanding of what defines a metal — and lands the cover of Science.

Ryan McMullen had never heard of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences when he started casting about for a graduate chemistry program. But on the recommendation of one of his professors, he sent an email to the College’s Professor of Chemistry Stephen Bradforth proposing an experiment to tease out what makes a metal really a metal.

Continue reading “Results of an Experiment” »

Jul 3, 2020

Toward lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics

Posted by in categories: innovation, quantum physics

In a paper that made the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, an international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers. This approach, based on the compression of light pulses, would make it possible to reach a threshold intensity for a new type of physics that has never been explored before: quantum electrodynamics phenomena.

Researchers Jean-Claude Kieffer of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), E. A. Khazanov of the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences and in France Gérard Mourou, Professor Emeritus of the Ecole Polytechnique, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018, have chosen another direction to achieve a power of around 1023 watts (W). Rather than increasing the energy of the laser, they decrease the pulse duration to only a few femtoseconds. This would keep the system within a reasonable size and keep operating costs down.

To generate the shortest possible pulse, the researchers are exploiting the effects of non-linear optics. “A is sent through an extremely thin and perfectly homogeneous glass plate. The particular behavior of the wave inside this solid medium broadens the spectrum and allows for a shorter pulse when it is recompressed at the exit of the plate,” explains Jean-Claude Kieffer, co-author of the study published online on 15 June 2020 in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

Jun 29, 2020

Molten-Salt Fusion Reactors and Molten-Salt Fission Reactors — Dr. Charles Forsberg @ ORNL MSRW 2019

Posted by in categories: innovation, nuclear energy

Dr. Charles Forsberg observes technological overlap between Molten-Salt Reactor (fission) development and Fusion Reactors due to manufacturing breakthrough of Rare-Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) Superconducting Magnets onto steel tape.

REBCO superconducting tape enables doubling magnetic fields.

Continue reading “Molten-Salt Fusion Reactors and Molten-Salt Fission Reactors — Dr. Charles Forsberg @ ORNL MSRW 2019” »

Jun 29, 2020

First measurement of spin-orbit alignment on planet Beta Pictoris b

Posted by in categories: innovation, space

Astronomers have made the first measurement of spin-orbit alignment for a distant ‘super-Jupiter’ planet, demonstrating a technique that could enable breakthroughs in the quest to understand how exoplanetary systems form and evolved.

An international team of scientists, led by Professor Stefan Kraus from the University of Exeter, has carried out the measurements for the exoplanet Beta Pictoris b—located 63 light years from Earth.

The planet, found in the Pictor constellation, has a mass of around 11 times that of Jupiter and orbits a young star on a similar as Saturn in our solar system.

Jun 29, 2020

This Dutch invention uses bubbles to trap plastic trash in rivers

Posted by in category: innovation

Read more

Jun 28, 2020

The Next Wave Of AI Disruption: Millennial And Generation Z Entrepreneurial Pioneers

Posted by in categories: innovation, robotics/AI

With perspectives and passions, Millennial and Generation Z entrepreneurs are at the forefront of AI innovation. They are unlocking new ways to do even the mundane tasks and will forever change how we work and look at the world.

Jun 28, 2020

MIT’s Top 5 tech breakthroughs for 2020

Posted by in category: innovation

These are the top advances in technology that will impact the world in the coming decade.

Jun 23, 2020

An experiment suggested by a Ph.D. student may rewrite chemistry textbooks

Posted by in categories: chemistry, innovation

Yan McMullen had never heard of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences when he started casting about for a graduate chemistry program. But on the recommendation of one of his professors, he sent an email to the College’s Professor of Chemistry Stephen Bradforth proposing an experiment to tease out what makes a metal really a metal.

The proposal would not only turn into his Ph.D. thesis but a major scientific breakthrough.

Continue reading “An experiment suggested by a Ph.D. student may rewrite chemistry textbooks” »

Jun 20, 2020

NASA gets set to put astronauts on Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic suborbital flights

Posted by in categories: innovation, space travel

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine signaled today that astronauts would soon be cleared to take suborbital spaceflights aboard the commercial rocket ships being tested by Virgin Galactic and by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture.

“NASA is developing the process to fly astronauts on commercial suborbital spacecraft,” Bridenstine said in a tweet. “Whether it’s suborbital, orbital or deep space, NASA will utilize our nation’s innovative commercial capabilities.”

Continue reading “NASA gets set to put astronauts on Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic suborbital flights” »

Jun 18, 2020

AI creates realistic faces from crude sketches

Posted by in categories: innovation, robotics/AI

Back in the Sixties, one of the hottest toys in history swept America. It was called Etch-A-Sketch, and its popularity was based on a now-laughably simple feature. It was a handheld small-laptop-sized device that allowed users to create crude images by turning two control knobs that drew horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines composed of aluminum particles sealed in a plastic case. It allowed experienced artists to compose simple and sometimes recognizable portraits. And it allowed inexperienced wannabe artists who could barely draw stick-figure characters to feel like masters of the genre by generating what, frankly, still looked pretty much like mush. But Etch-A-Sketch was fun, and it went on to sell 100 million units to this day.

Six decades later, researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and City University of Hong Kong have come up with an invention that actually does what so many wishful enthusiasts imagined Etch-A-Sketch did all those years ago.

Continue reading “AI creates realistic faces from crude sketches” »

Page 1 of 9012345678Last