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Archive for the ‘biotech/medical’ category

Jul 20, 2019

Taking the sting out: Australian gene editing is crossing the pain threshold

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

A Sydney team has developed a box jellyfish antidote so simple it can go on as a spray. But it’s only the first step.

Jul 20, 2019

What if you were immune to chronic pain?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, information science, neuroscience

Our current approach to treating chronic pain is drug-based, but a vaccine-based approach can cut addiction out of the equation. In this video, Big Think contributor Lou Reese, co-founder of United Neuroscience, explains how soon we may soon be able to vaccinate people, en masse, against pain!

Jul 20, 2019

Can Learning a Foreign Language Prevent Dementia?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

The evidence is far less clear than popular media might lead you to believe.

By: richard roberts and roger kreuz

You may have heard that learning another language is one method for preventing or at least postponing the onset of dementia. Dementia refers to the loss of cognitive abilities, and one of its most common forms is Alzheimer’s disease. At this time, the causes of the disease are not well understood, and consequently, there are no proven steps that people can take to prevent it. Nonetheless, some researchers have suggested that learning a foreign language might help delay the onset of dementia.

Jul 20, 2019

Lyme disease: is a solution on the way?

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

The tick-borne illness, which is on the rise, can have chronic side-effects. So why hasn’t more effort been put into a cure?

Jul 20, 2019

AAPM 2019: medical physicists assemble in Texas

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

At this year’s meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the temperature was scorching and the physics was exceptional.

Jul 20, 2019

Aging Well – Aubrey de Grey, PhD, Co-founder of SENS Research Foundation – Taking the Fight to An… — YouTube

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

In this podcast, Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D., and the Chief Science Officer/Co-founder of SENS Research Foundation discusses his fascination with aging and his ongoing efforts to change the way we think about, and treat, age-related conditions. Dr. de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist and the innovative developer of the SENS platform. He is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the American Aging Association. He received a Ph.D. in Biology from the prestigious University of Cambridge. Dr. de Grey states that aging is the greatest medical problem we face as it causes the most suffering. He discusses the various excuses that are given as reason to simply disregard aging as a field in need of greater research, from the standard, ‘everything ages, just accept it,’ to the more philosophical—‘death, by its existence, gives meaning to life,’ and the social excuse—‘treating aging in a new way would only create new problems that could be much worse.’ But according to Dr. de Gray, not a single excuse holds up, all fall to the slightest scrutiny when really considered. Dr. de Grey explains that in order to design and implement therapies that will prevent the health problems of an aging population, we need to learn from what has already been proven and acknowledged in the past. SENS Research Foundation seeks to develop and promote access to innovative new therapies that can cure or possibly even prevent the diseases and difficult, troubling disabilities of aging by repairing built-up damage in our bodies. Wrapping up, Dr. de Grey explains cell therapy and damage, loss of cells, and the processes needed to bring about the repair. And the doctor goes into detail regarding the injection of stem cells to repair the damage, replace lost cells, etc.

Jul 20, 2019

Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Urolithin A, a metabolite of biomolecules found in pomegranates and other fruits, could help slow certain aging processes. EPFL spin-off Amazentis, in conjunction with EPFL and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, has published a paper Metabolism outlining the results of their clinical trial.

It is a fact of life that skeletal muscles begin to lose strength and mass once a person reaches the age of 50. A recent clinical trial involving two EPFL entities — spin-off Amazentis and the Laboratory of Integrative Systems Physiology (LISP) — showed that urolithin A, a compound derived from biomolecules found in fruits such as pomegranates, could slow down this process by improving the functioning of mitochondria — the cells’ powerhouses. A joint paper presenting the results of the trial also demonstrates that ingesting the compound poses no risk to human health.

Slowing mitochondrial aging.

Jul 19, 2019

Using a Genealogy DNA Test to Overcome Genealogy Brick Walls

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Many people are using DNA testing to pass brick walls in their family trees. When you’ve reached a dead end, DNA testing may help you research further.

Jul 19, 2019

Treating patients with gene therapies

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Liz Parrish, BioViva Sciences Inc CEO, chats with James Strole, Director of the Coalition for Radical Life Extension, about what she’s bringing to RAADfest 2019: gene therapies as regenerative treatments on human patients.

Hear what she has to share, and meet her at RAADfest 2019, October 3–6, Las Vegas, NV.

For more info and to register: http://www.raadfest.com/

Jul 19, 2019

Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice’s minds

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, neuroscience

Hallucinations are spooky and, fortunately, fairly rare. But, a new study suggests, the real question isn’t so much why some people occasionally experience them. It’s why all of us aren’t hallucinating all the time.

In the study, Stanford University School of Medicine neuroscientists stimulated nerve cells in the visual cortex of to induce an illusory image in the animals’ minds. The scientists needed to stimulate a surprisingly small number of , or neurons, in order to generate the perception, which caused the mice to behave in a particular way.

“Back in 2012, we had described the ability to control the activity of individually selected neurons in an awake, alert animal,” said Karl Deisseroth, MD, Ph.D., professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “Now, for the first time, we’ve been able to advance this capability to control multiple individually specified cells at once, and make an animal perceive something specific that in fact is not really there—and behave accordingly.”

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