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May 7, 2021

Latest Neural Nets Solve World’s Hardest Equations Faster Than Ever Before

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

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Two new approaches allow deep neural networks to solve entire families of partial differential equations, making it easier to model complicated systems and to do so orders of magnitude faster.

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May 6, 2021

New device can measure glucose in sweat with the touch of a fingertip

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, information science

Many people with diabetes endure multiple, painful finger pricks each day to measure their blood glucose. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sensors have developed a device that can measure glucose in sweat with the touch of a fingertip, and then a personalized algorithm provides an accurate estimate of blood glucose levels.

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 34 million children and adults in the U.S. have diabetes. Although self-monitoring of blood glucose is a critical part of diabetes management, the pain and inconvenience caused by finger-stick blood sampling can keep people from testing as often as they should.

The researchers made a touch-based sweat glucose sensor with a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel on top of an electrochemical sensor, which was screen-printed onto a flexible plastic strip. When a volunteer placed their fingertip on the sensor surface for 1 minute, the hydrogel absorbed tiny amounts of sweat. Inside the sensor, glucose in the sweat underwent an enzymatic reaction that resulted in a small electrical current that was detected by a hand-held device.

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May 6, 2021

New algorithm uses a hologram to control trapped ions

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, holograms, information science, quantum physics

Researchers have discovered the most precise way to control individual ions using holographic optical engineering technology.

The new technology uses the first known holographic optical engineering device to control trapped ion qubits. This technology promises to help create more precise controls of qubits that will aid the development of quantum industry-specific hardware to further new quantum simulation experiments and potentially quantum error correction processes for trapped ion qubits.

“Our algorithm calculates the hologram’s profile and removes any aberrations from the light, which lets us develop a highly precise technique for programming ions,” says lead author Chung-You Shih, a Ph.D. student at the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC).

May 2, 2021

Quantifying Biological Age: Blood Test #2 in 2021

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, information science, life extension

Paper references for Levine’s Phenotypic Age calculator and aging.ai:

An epigenetic biomarker of aging for lifespan and healthspan:
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29676998/

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May 1, 2021

Artificial Intelligence Algorithm Helps Unravel the Physics Underlying Quantum Systems

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, particle physics, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Protocol to reverse engineer Hamiltonian models advances automation of quantum devices.

Scientists from the University of Bristol ’s Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QETLabs) have developed an algorithm that provides valuable insights into the physics underlying quantum systems — paving the way for significant advances in quantum computation and sensing, and potentially turning a new page in scientific investigation.

In physics, systems of particles and their evolution are described by mathematical models, requiring the successful interplay of theoretical arguments and experimental verification. Even more complex is the description of systems of particles interacting with each other at the quantum mechanical level, which is often done using a Hamiltonian model. The process of formulating Hamiltonian models from observations is made even harder by the nature of quantum states, which collapse when attempts are made to inspect them.

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Apr 30, 2021

Computer vision inches toward ‘common sense’ with Facebook’s latest research

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

Machine learning is capable of doing all sorts of things as long as you have the data to teach it how. That’s not always easy, and researchers are always looking for a way to add a bit of “common sense” to AI so you don’t have to show it 500 pictures of a cat before it gets it. Facebook’s newest research takes a big step toward reducing the data bottleneck.

The company’s formidable AI research division has been working for years now on how to advance and scale things like advanced computer vision algorithms, and has made steady progress, generally shared with the rest of the research community. One interesting development Facebook has pursued in particular is what’s called “semi-supervised learning.”

Generally when you think of training an AI, you think of something like the aforementioned 500 pictures of cats — images that have been selected and labeled (which can mean outlining the cat, putting a box around the cat or just saying there’s a cat in there somewhere) so that the machine learning system can put together an algorithm to automate the process of cat recognition. Naturally if you want to do dogs or horses, you need 500 dog pictures, 500 horse pictures, etc. — it scales linearly, which is a word you never want to see in tech.

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Apr 30, 2021

Machine learning algorithm helps unravel the physics underlying quantum systems

Posted by in categories: information science, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Scientists from the University of Bristol’s Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QETLabs) have developed an algorithm that provides valuable insights into the physics underlying quantum systems—paving the way for significant advances in quantum computation and sensing, and potentially turning a new page in scientific investigation.

Apr 28, 2021

The Science of Consciousness: Towards the Cybernetic Theory of Mind

Posted by in categories: biological, information science, robotics/AI, science

Consciousness remains scientifically elusive because it constitutes layers upon layers of non-material emergence: Reverse-engineering our thinking should be done in terms of networks, modules, algorithms and second-order emergence — meta-algorithms, or groups of modules. Neuronal circuits correlate to “immaterial” cognitive modules, and these cognitive algorithms, when activated, produce meta-algorithmic conscious awareness and phenomenal experience, all in all at least two layers of emergence on top of “physical” neurons. Furthermore, consciousness represents certain transcendent aspects of projective ontology, according to the now widely accepted Holographic Principle.

#CyberneticTheoryofMind

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Apr 27, 2021

Nvidia Entangled in Quantum Simulators

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, quantum physics

Quantum simulators are a strange breed of systems for purposes that might seem a bit nebulous from the outset. These are often HPC clusters with fast interconnects and powerful server processors (although not usually equipped with accelerators) that run a literal simulation of how various quantum circuits function for design and testing of quantum hardware and algorithms. Quantum simulators do more than just test. They can also be used to emulate quantum problem solving and serve as a novel approach to tackling problems without all the quantum hardware complexity.

Despite the various uses, there’s only so much commercial demand for quantum simulators. Companies like IBM have their own internally and for others, Atos/Bull have created these based on their big memory Sequanna systems but these are, as one might imagine, niche machines for special purposes. Nonetheless, Nvidia sees enough opportunity in this arena to make an announcement at their GTC event about the performance of quantum simulators using the DGX A100 and its own custom-cooked quantum development software stack, called CuQuantum.

After all, it is probably important for Nvidia to have some kind of stake in quantum before (and if) it ever really takes off, especially in large-scale and scientific computing. What better way to get an insider view than to work with quantum hardware and software developers who are designing better codes and qubits via a benchmark and testing environment?

Apr 24, 2021

Now for AI’s Latest Trick: Writing Computer Code

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, information science, robotics/AI, transportation

Advances in machine learning have made it possible to automate a growing array of coding tasks, from auto-completing segments of code and fine tuning algorithms… See More.


Programs such as GPT-3 can compose convincing text. Some people are using the tool to automate software development and hunt for bugs.

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