Blog

Archive for the ‘wearables’ category

Jul 23, 2021

Development of stretchable metallic glass electrodes†

Posted by in categories: electronics, wearables

Stretchable electrodes are essential components for wearable electronics. However, the stretchability of the electrodes is often achieved with the sacrifice of electronic conductivity along with huge variation in resistance. In this work, stretchable metallic glass electrodes (MG-electrodes) that have both h.

Jul 23, 2021

Mind the gap: State-of-the-art technologies and applications for EEG-based brain–computer interfaces

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, education, law, neuroscience, security, wearables

Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) provide bidirectional communication between the brain and output devices that translate user intent into function. Among the different brain imaging techniques used to operate BCIs, electroencephalography (EEG) constitutes the preferred method of choice, owing to its relative low cost, ease of use, high temporal resolution, and noninvasiveness. In recent years, significant progress in wearable technologies and computational intelligence has greatly enhanced the performance and capabilities of EEG-based BCIs (eBCIs) and propelled their migration out of the laboratory and into real-world environments. This rapid translation constitutes a paradigm shift in human–machine interaction that will deeply transform different industries in the near future, including healthcare and wellbeing, entertainment, security, education, and marketing. In this contribution, the state-of-the-art in wearable biosensing is reviewed, focusing on the development of novel electrode interfaces for long term and noninvasive EEG monitoring. Commercially available EEG platforms are surveyed, and a comparative analysis is presented based on the benefits and limitations they provide for eBCI development. Emerging applications in neuroscientific research and future trends related to the widespread implementation of eBCIs for medical and nonmedical uses are discussed. Finally, a commentary on the ethical, social, and legal concerns associated with this increasingly ubiquitous technology is provided, as well as general recommendations to address key issues related to mainstream consumer adoption.

Jul 22, 2021

Wearable brain-machine interface turns intentions into actions

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, virtual reality, wearables

A new wearable brain-machine interface (BMI) system could improve the quality of life for people with motor dysfunction or paralysis, even those struggling with locked-in syndrome—when a person is fully conscious but unable to move or communicate.

A multi-institutional, international team of researchers led by the lab of Woon-Hong Yeo at the Georgia Institute of Technology combined wireless soft scalp electronics and virtual reality in a BMI system that allows the user to imagine an action and wirelessly control a wheelchair or robotic arm.

The team, which included researchers from the University of Kent (United Kingdom) and Yonsei University (Republic of Korea), describes the new motor imagery-based BMI system this month in the journal Advanced Science.

Continue reading “Wearable brain-machine interface turns intentions into actions” »

Jul 21, 2021

Chairless Chair

Posted by in category: wearables

Wearable chair. WOW.

Jul 20, 2021

Engineers develop practical way to make artificial skin

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, cyborgs, wearables

Chemical engineer Zhenan Bao and her team of researchers at Stanford have spent nearly two decades trying to develop skin-like integrated circuits that can be stretched, folded, bent and twisted — working all the while — and then snap back without fail, every time. Such circuits presage a day of wearable and implantable products, but one hurdle has always stood in the way.

Namely, “How does one produce a completely new technology in quantities great enough to make commercialization possible?” Bao said. Bao and team think they have a solution. In a new study, the group describes how they have printed stretchable-yet-durable integrated circuits on rubbery, skin-like materials, using the same equipment designed to make solid silicon chips — an accomplishment that could ease the transition to commercialization by switching foundries that today make rigid circuits to producing stretchable ones.


Stanford researchers show how to print dense transistor arrays on skin-like materials to create stretchable circuits that flex with the body to perform applications yet to be imagined.

Continue reading “Engineers develop practical way to make artificial skin” »

Jul 14, 2021

New wearable device uses human sweat to power electronics

Posted by in categories: energy, space, wearables

Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a new wearable device that turns the touch of a finger into a source of power for small electronics and sensors. The device is a thin, flexible strip worn on a fingertip and generates small amounts of electricity when a person’s finger sweats or presses on it.

More interestingly, this sweat-powered device is capable of generating power even when the wearer is asleep or sitting still. This could open up some very interesting possibilities in the wearable space, as the researchers have now figured out how to harness the energy that can be extracted from human sweat even when a person is not moving.

Continue reading “New wearable device uses human sweat to power electronics” »

Jul 13, 2021

Calling All Couch Potatoes: This Finger Wrap Can Let You Power Electronics While You Sleep

Posted by in categories: energy, engineering, health, wearables

A new wearable device turns the touch of a finger into a source of power for small electronics and sensors. Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a thin, flexible strip that can be worn on a fingertip and generate small amounts of electricity when a person’s finger sweats or presses on it.

What’s special about this sweat-fueled device is that it generates power even while the wearer is asleep or sitting still. This is potentially a big deal for the field of wearables because researchers have now figured out how to harness the energy that can be extracted from human sweat even when a person is not moving.

Continue reading “Calling All Couch Potatoes: This Finger Wrap Can Let You Power Electronics While You Sleep” »

Jul 2, 2021

Skin in the game: Transformative approach uses the human body to recharge smartwatches

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, wearables

As smart watches are increasingly able to monitor the vital signs of health, including what’s going on when we sleep, a problem has emerged: Those wearable, wireless devices are often disconnected from our body overnight, being charged at the bedside.

“Quality of sleep and its patterns contain a lot of important information about patients’ health conditions,” says Sunghoon Ivan Lee, assistant professor in the University of Massachusetts Amherst College of Information and Computer Sciences and director of the Advanced Human Health Analytics Laboratory.

Continue reading “Skin in the game: Transformative approach uses the human body to recharge smartwatches” »

Jun 23, 2021

Google deepens its healthcare presence: A timeline of the last year

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, wearables

Google has invested heavily in healthcare. I think in the end, they will be the ultimate profile provider for users. Just connect your electronic health record with your personal profile combined with Fitbit wearable technologies.


Google has made moves to expand its presence in the healthcare sector during the last 12 months, including multiple partnerships with health systems, several new product launches and efforts to facilitate the country’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout.

Below is a timeline of Google’s key healthcare moves reported by Becker’s Hospital Review since June 2020.

Continue reading “Google deepens its healthcare presence: A timeline of the last year” »

Jun 10, 2021

Future washable smart clothes powered by Wi-Fi

Posted by in categories: internet, wearables

Researchers at Purdue University, Indiana, have developed a method to transform ordinary clothes into battery-free wearables that are waterproof and resistant to laundry. These smart fabrics can be powered wirelessly through a flexible, silk-based coil sewn on the textile.

Page 1 of 3712345678Last