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Jul 15, 2019

Maria Blasco at Ending Age-Related Diseases 2019

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Leading telomere researcher Maria Blasco press conference at the Ending Age-Related Diseases conference, New York, NY, July 12, 2019.

Jul 15, 2019

Rare Human-Sized Giant Jellyfish Caught On Camera

Posted by in category: electronics

Two divers caught a jellyfish as big as a human on camera this weekend.

Jul 15, 2019

Green light for a new generation of dynamic materials

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, sustainability

Developing synthetic materials that are as dynamic as those found in nature, with reversibly changing properties and which could be used in manufacturing, recycling and other applications, is a strong focus for scientists.

In a world-first, researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Ghent University (UGent) and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have pioneered a novel, dynamic, reprogrammable material—by using green LED and, remarkably, darkness as the switches to change the material’s polymer structure, and using only two inexpensive compounds. One of these compounds, naphthalene, is well known as an ingredient in moth repellents.

The new dynamic material could potentially be used as a 3D printing ink to print temporary, easy-to-remove support scaffolds. This would overcome one of the current limitations of the 3D process to print free-hanging structures.

Jul 15, 2019

Path to Million Qubit Quantum Computers Using Atoms and Lasers

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Atom Computing is building quantum computers using individually controlled atoms.

As one of the world’s leading researchers in atomic clocks and neutral atoms, Benjamin Bloom (co-founder of Atom Computing) built the world’s fastest atomic clock, and it is considered the most precise and accurate measurement ever performed.

Ben has shown that neutral atoms could be more scalable, and could build a stable solution to create and maintain controlled quantum states. He used his expertise to lead efforts at Intel on their 10nm semiconductor chip, and then to lead research and development of the first cloud-accessible quantum computer at Rigetti.

Jul 15, 2019

Researchers develop computer model of ferrofluid motion

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, nanotechnology

Ferrofluids, with their mesmeric display of shape-shifting spikes, are a favorite exhibit in science shows. These eye-catching examples of magnetic fields in action could become even more dramatic through computational work that captures their motion.

A KAUST research team has now developed a computer model of motion that could be used to design even grander ferrofluid displays. The work is a stepping stone to using to inform the use of ferrofluids in broad range of practical applications, such as medicine, acoustics, radar-absorbing materials and nanoelectronics.

Ferrofluids were developed by NASA in the 1960s as a way to pump fuels in low gravity. They comprise nanoscale magnetic particles of iron-laden compounds suspended in a liquid. In the absence of a magnetic , ferrofluids possess a perfectly smooth surface. But when a magnet is brought close to the ferrofluid, the particles rapidly align with the magnetic field, forming the characteristic spiky appearance. If a magnetic object is placed in the ferrofluid, the spikes will even climb the object before cascading back down.

Jul 15, 2019

The US Army will test armored robotic vehicles in 2020

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

The tests are designed to see how soldiers will operate robots in the field.

Jul 15, 2019

Researchers’ deep learning algorithm solves Rubik’s Cube faster than any human

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, robotics/AI

Since its invention by a Hungarian architect in 1974, the Rubik’s Cube has furrowed the brows of many who have tried to solve it, but the 3D logic puzzle is no match for an artificial intelligence system created by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

DeepCubeA, a learning algorithm programmed by UCI scientists and mathematicians, can find the solution in a fraction of a second, without any specific domain knowledge or in-game coaching from humans. This is no simple task considering that the cube has completion paths numbering in the billions but only one goal state—each of six sides displaying a solid color—which apparently can’t be found through random moves.

For a study published today in Nature Machine Intelligence, the researchers demonstrated that DeepCubeA solved 100 percent of all test configurations, finding the to the goal state about 60 percent of the time. The algorithm also works on other combinatorial games such as the sliding tile , Lights Out and Sokoban.

Jul 15, 2019

Intel’s Neuromorphic System Hits 8 Million Neurons, 100 Million Coming by 2020

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

Researchers can use the 64-chip Pohoiki Beach system to make systems that learn and see the world more like humans.

Jul 15, 2019

Ebola spreads to largest city yet in DR Congo

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

The Democratic Republic of Congo has confirmed the first case of Ebola in the eastern city of Goma, a major transport hub.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said the case could be a “game-changer” given the city’s population of more than two million.

But the WHO expressed confidence in plans to deal with the diagnosis.

Jul 15, 2019

Free Energy Generator

Posted by in category: energy

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