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Archive for the ‘surveillance’ category: Page 18

Aug 3, 2019

How to Hack a Face: From Facial Recognition to Facial Recreation

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, information science, mobile phones, privacy, robotics/AI, surveillance

Given that going viral on the Internet is often cyclical, it should come as no surprise that an app that made its debut in 2017 has once again surged in popularity. FaceApp applies various transformations to the image of any face, but the option that ages facial features has been especially popular. However, the fun has been accompanied by controversy; since biometric systems are replacing access passwords, is it wise to freely offer up our image and our personal data? The truth is that today the face is ceasing to be as non-transferable as it used to be, and in just a few years it could be more hackable than the password of a lifetime.

Our countenance is the most recognisable key to social relationships. We might have doubts when hearing a voice on the phone, but never when looking at the face of a familiar person. In the 1960s, a handful of pioneering researchers began training computers to recognise human faces, although it was not until the 1990s that this technology really began to take off. Facial recognition algorithms have improved to such an extent that since 1993 their error rate has been halved every two years. When it comes to recognising unfamiliar faces in laboratory experiments, today’s systems outperform human capabilities.

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Aug 2, 2019

Mass Surveillance: 1 in 2 Americans Are Already In A Government Facial Recognition Database

Posted by in categories: government, robotics/AI, surveillance, transportation

As well as Gait Recognition. (Go ahead and wear a disguise.)


The mass surveillance of innocent Americans continues as George Orwell’s 1984 becomes more of a reality with each passing day. “All told, we are barreling toward a future where every ritual of public life carries implicit consent to be surveilled,” writes Sidney Fussell for The Atlantic.

A new report from Georgetown Law‘s Center on Privacy & Technology (CPT) suggests that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) may be using the rampant problem of illegal immigration as a type of cover to track and spy on Americans in violation of their Fourth Amendment rights. Three years ago, the center revealed that nearly half of all U.S. adults are already in the FBI’s facial recognition database, which is largely sourced from DMV photos.

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Jul 30, 2019

Electronic Harassment Must Stop‼️ Photo

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, surveillance

Do you know how to jam these?


Description:

The StingRay is an IMSI-catcher, a controversial cellular phone surveillance device, manufactured by Harris Corporation.

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Jul 28, 2019

The French Have Plans For A Constellation Of Laser-Armed Miniature Satellites

Posted by in categories: satellites, surveillance

France’s “Mastering Space” plan calls for an active defense against hostile satellites and new space-based surveillance capabilities to spot threats.

Jul 24, 2019

Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away

Posted by in categories: electronics, surveillance

With a focal length equivalent to 1000mm.

Jul 21, 2019

How an authoritarian regime will intercept all internet traffic inside its country

Posted by in categories: encryption, government, internet, security, surveillance

How dictators work in the 21st century.


The new president of Kazakhstan is now proving that he will keep the old, oppressive systems alive for the 21st century, using advanced technical tools.

The man in the middle: Beginning last week, Kazakhstan’s government is intercepting all HTTPS traffic inside the country, ZDNet reports. HTTPS is a protocol meant to offer encryption, security, and privacy to users, but now the nation’s internet service providers are forcing all users to install certificates that enable pervasive interception and surveillance.

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Jul 20, 2019

China: Facing up to hyper-surveillance

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, surveillance

China is the world leader in facial recognition technology. But is the state using it to violate the human rights of its citizens?

Jul 19, 2019

Private Surveillance Is a Lethal Weapon Anybody Can Buy

Posted by in category: surveillance

Is it too late to rein it in?

Jul 14, 2019

Can I Check Web Sites Visited by my Kids/Staff?

Posted by in categories: computing, internet, policy, privacy, security, software, surveillance

Early this morning, I was asked this question at Quora. It’s a pretty basic request of network administrators, including parents, schools and anyone who administers a public, sensitive or legally exposed WiFi hot spot.

Is there a quick and easy way to view, log, or otherwise monitor the web sites visited by people on your home or office network?

Yes. It’s free and and it is pretty easy to do.

It gets a bit trickier, if the individual on your network is using a VPN service that they have configured on their device.[1] A VPN does not stop you from logging their browsing, but all of their activity will point to the VPN address instead of the site that they are actually visiting. In that case, there is another way to monitor their activity. See note #1, below.

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Jul 5, 2019

China Snares Tourists’ Phones in Surveillance Dragnet

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, surveillance

BEIJING — China has turned its western region of Xinjiang into a police state with few modern parallels, employing a combination of high-tech surveillance and enormous manpower to monitor and subdue the area’s predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities.

Now, the digital dragnet is expanding beyond Xinjiang’s residents, ensnaring tourists, traders and other visitors — and digging deep into their smartphones.

A team of journalists from The New York Times and other publications examined a policing app used in the region, getting a rare look inside the intrusive technologies that China is deploying in the name of quelling Islamic radicalism and strengthening Communist Party rule in its Far West. The use of the app has not been previously reported.

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