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Archive for the ‘security’ category: Page 114

Jun 8, 2016

Our Skynet Moment: Debating Morality Of AI – Analysis

Posted by in categories: computing, robotics/AI, security

The rapid growth of artificial intelligence (AI) has serious implications for our future. The issues and their oversight are not just the domain of computer engineers, technologists and AI experts. Policymakers, Smart Nation experts and security officials too should come together with them to ponder implications and set out the parameters, if needed, for future research and development.

By Shashi Jayakumar(

In March this year, AlphaGo, a machine created by Google’s artificial intelligence (AI) arm, DeepMind, trounced Lee Sedol, a grandmaster at Go, the ancient Chinese game. AlphaGo used cutting-edge AI to beat a player acknowledged to be one of the greatest ever.

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Jun 8, 2016

Worldwide quantum web may be possible with help from graphs

Posted by in categories: internet, mathematics, particle physics, quantum physics, security

(Phys.org)—One of the most ambitious endeavors in quantum physics right now is to build a large-scale quantum network that could one day span the entire globe. In a new study, physicists have shown that describing quantum networks in a new way—as mathematical graphs—can help increase the distance that quantum information can be transmitted. Compared to classical networks, quantum networks have potential advantages such as better security and being faster under certain circumstances.

“A worldwide network may appear quite similar to the internet—a huge number of devices connected in a way that allows the exchange of information between any of them,” coauthor Michael Epping, a physicist at the University of Waterloo in Canada, told Phys.org. “But the crucial difference is that the laws of quantum theory will be dominant for the description of that information. For example, the state of the fundamental information carrier can be a superposition of the basis states 0 and 1. By now, several advantages in comparison to classical information are known, such as prime number factorization and secret communication. However, the biggest benefit of quantum networks might well be discovered by future research in the rapidly developing field of theory.”

Quantum networks involve sending entangled particles across long distances, which is challenging because particle loss and decoherence tend to scale exponentially with the distance.

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Jun 7, 2016

Security experts wary of the Pentagon’s new microchip supplier

Posted by in categories: computing, military, satellites, security

To provide computing power for the U.S. arsenal of advanced weaponry, satellites and information systems, the Pentagon has entered into a seven-year deal with Globalfoundries Inc, an Abu Dhabi-owned microchip manufacturer.

The move serves to diversify the Defense Department’s microchip supply chain — an issue of particular concern for some defense officials — which has been dominated by a short list of sellers led by IBM for over a decade.

A microchip is a small, wafer-thin semiconductor used to relay information through an electrical grid, thereby making an integrated circuit. Almost every modern digital device is chock-full of microchips.

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Jun 6, 2016

A former NASA chief just launched this AI startup to turbocharge neural computing

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, military, neuroscience, robotics/AI, security

Good for him.


A new company launched Monday by former NASA chief Dan Goldin aims to deliver a major boost to the field of neural computing.

KnuEdge’s debut comes after 10 years in stealth; formerly it was called Intellisis. Now, along with its launch, it’s introducing two products focused on neural computing: KnuVerse, software that focuses on military-grade voice recognition and authentication, and KnuPath, a processor designed to offer a new architecture for neural computing.

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Jun 5, 2016

Russian hi-tech spy devices under attack over privacy fears

Posted by in categories: business, mobile phones, security

New Russian technologies, including phonecall interception and a facial recognition app, have stirred a fierce debate about privacy and data monitoring.

Infowatch, a Moscow-based IT security company managed by businesswoman Natalya Kasperskaya, found itself in hot water last month after it revealed it had invented a system that companies can use to intercept employees’ mobile phone conversations.

Companies outside Russia have also devised call interception software, and Infowatch already markets products that monitor employees’ e-mails, USB keys and printers.

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Jun 2, 2016

Network security shifting toward machine learning, quantum computing, predicts expert

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, robotics/AI, security

Very true points by Kharam.


At SC Congress Toronto, Evgeniy Kharam, director and network security solutions architect at Herjavec Group predicted that the future network security was in machine learning, quantum computing and the cloud.

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Jun 2, 2016

DoD to launch info-sharing system to protect against insider threats

Posted by in categories: government, military, security

I could see this for those US Gov. non-classified and even some lower risk classified systems. However, when I had worked in government we found for the “Top Secret” and highly “Classified” systems that the best secured method is to continue to leave these systems unconnected and using those floppy disks to transfer information. Yes it’s dinosaur technology; it has been proven time and time again to be the most reliable and safest until we have QC on a massive scale adopted.


The Defense Department is creating an information-sharing platform that will monitor risks posed by government employees and other individuals in possession of high-level U.S. government security clearance.

The program, known as “Department of Defense (DoD) Component Insider Threat Records System” is part of an executive order signed by President Obama in October 2011. The system aims to prevent leaks of classified government information and will monitor individuals who were granted eligibility to access classified information and those “who have exhibited actual, probable, or possible indications of insider threat behaviors or activities.” This includes National Guard and military reserves personnel, employees, DoD contractors.

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May 31, 2016

China’s Quantum Satellite Next Month to Make China Communications Difficult to Crack

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, satellites, security

As the world is wary about cyber hackers in China, the next big thing for it is launching an experimental quantum communication satellite in July that was designed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), making it first of its kind.

Since quantum communications assure the highest level of security being hard to replicate or separate. Nor can it be reverse engineered as it involves a complex process employing quantum entanglement. Once it is successful, China can be sure that no one can crack into its security networks, making it impossible for any world power to snoop around.

Developed over the last five years, the quantum satellite will be launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center with four ground stations to track and facilitate communication. Moreover, it will have one space quantum teleportation experiment station, said a report prepared by CAS.

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May 28, 2016

Google’s late response to Amazon Echo suggests the future is voice control and virtual reality

Posted by in categories: business, food, robotics/AI, security, virtual reality

The recent Google I/O developer conference at which the company reveals its new products and directions brought with it several surprising announcements that mark significant changes for the way the company approaches its online business.

The first was the admission by Google chief executive, Sundar Pichai, that Amazon had taken the lead in voice-activated devices when it launched Echo last year when he announced the company’s own Google Home, a similar table-top, voice-controlled AI assistant. These devices have been made possible by the rapid improvement of voice-recognition technology and AI fast enough to respond in real time to questions and answers. But under the surface, the devices are deeply integrated with the cloud, and in the case of Echo, Amazon’s online marketplace.

This is significant because Echo now boasts more than 400 different “skills” and connected suppliers through which users can order food, look up calendar appointments, pay credit card bills, search for information and many other things – just by asking with their voice. The ecosystem of companion products around these intelligent assistants is growing too: just by asking, you can switch on the lights in any room, control the thermosat, security system and fire detectors, automate perimeter doors or fences.

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May 21, 2016

Computing a secret, unbreakable key

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, security

Awesome.


What once took months by some of the world’s leading scientists can now be done in seconds by undergraduate students thanks to software developed at the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing, paving the way for fast, secure quantum communication.

Researchers at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo developed the first available software to evaluate the security of any protocol for Quantum Key Distribution (QKD).

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