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Archive for the ‘science’ category: Page 119

Dec 17, 2015

Updated: Budget agreement boosts U.S. science

Posted by in category: science

NIH leads the pack as Congress hikes basic research at several agencies.

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Dec 16, 2015

Carlota Perez: In the midst of ICT revolution: next revolution 30 years out | vimeo.com

Posted by in categories: business, computing, economics, finance, governance, innovation, policy, robotics/AI, science, strategy

Economist Carlota Perez talk about the future of ICT.

Dec 6, 2015

From AI and data science to cryptography: Microsoft researchers offer 16 predictions for ’16

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, science

Visit the post for more.

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Dec 2, 2015

A Big Win for Cheap, Clean Energy — By Bill Gates | The Gates Notes

Posted by in categories: business, energy, environmental, innovation, science

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Nov 17, 2015

Can Artificial Intelligence Be Taught?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, evolution, machine learning, robotics/AI, science

In spite of the popular perception of the state of artificial intelligence, technology has yet to create a robot with the same instincts and adaptability as a human. While humans are born with some natural instincts that have evolved over millions of years, Neuroscientist and Artificial Intelligence Expert Dr. Danko Nikolic believes these same tendencies can be instilled in a robot.

“Our biological children are born with a set of knowledge. They know where to learn, they know where to pay attention. Robots simply can not do that,” Nikolic said. “The problem is you can not program it. There’s a trick we can use called AI Kindergarten. Then we can basically interact with this robot kind of like we do with children in kindergarten, but then make robots learn one level lower, at the level of something called machine genome.”

Programming that machine genome would require all of the innate human knowledge that’s evolved over thousands of years, Nikolic said. Lacking that ability, he said researchers are starting from scratch. While this form of artificial intelligence is still in its embryonic state, it does have some evolutionary advantages that humans didn’t have.

“By using AI Kindergarten, we don’t have to repeat the evolution exactly the way evolution has done it,” Nikolic said. “This experiment has been done already and the knowledge is already stored in our genes, so we can accelerate tremendously. We can skip millions of failed experiments where evolution has failed already.”

Continue reading “Can Artificial Intelligence Be Taught?” »

Nov 6, 2015

Can Humans Actually Have A Brain Like A Computer?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, neuroscience, science

With modern innovations such as artificial intelligence, virtual reality, wi-fi, tablet computing and more, it’s easy for man to look around and say that the human brain is a complex and well-evolved organ. But according to Author, Neuroscientist and Psychologist Gary Marcus, the human mind is actually constructed somewhat haphazardly, and there is still plenty of room for improvement.

“I called my book Kluge, which is an old engineer’s word for a clumsy solution. Think of MacGyver kind of duct tape and rubber bands,” Marcus said. “The thesis of that book is that the human mind is a kluge. I was thinking in terms of how this relates to evolutionary psychology and how our minds have been shaped by evolution.”

Marcus argued that evolution is not perfect, but instead it makes “local maxima,” which are good, but not necessarily the best possible solutions. As a parallel example, he cites the human spine, which allows us to stand upright; however, since it isn’t very well engineered, it also gives us back pain.

“You can imagine a better solution with three legs or branches that would distribute the load better, but we have this lousy solution where our spines are basically like a flag pole supporting 70 percent of our body weight,” Marcus said.

Continue reading “Can Humans Actually Have A Brain Like A Computer?” »

Nov 2, 2015

Mauna a Wakea: Hawai’i’s sacred mountain and the contentious Thirty Meter Telescope | The Conversation

Posted by in categories: astronomy, science, space

image-20150914-1212-mfvscn

“Should astronomers be allowed to build the TMT on Mauna Kea? This question raises concerns that we, as practising astronomers, see as a reoccurring issue within the scientific community.”

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Oct 22, 2015

Quantum Theory: ‘Spooky Action at a Distance’ confirmed

Posted by in categories: encryption, general relativity, physics, quantum physics, science

In one of my first articles for Lifeboat,* I provided an experimental methodology for demonstrating (or proving) the instantaneous ‘communication’ between quantum entangled particles. Even though changes to one particle can be provably demonstrated at its far away twin, the very strange experimental results suggested by quantum theory also demonstrate that you cannot use the simultaneity for any purpose. That is, you can provably pass information instantly, but you cannot study the ‘message’ (a change in state at the recipient), until such time as it could have been transmit by a classical radio wave.

Now, scientists have conducted an experiment proving that objects can instantaneously affect each other, regardless o the distance between them. [continue below]

delft quantum entanglement apparatus

[From The New York Times—Oct 21, 2015]:

Sorry Einstein.
Quantum Study Suggests ‘Spooky Action’ is Real

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Oct 20, 2015

U.S. Plans $6 Billion Investment in Space Situational Awareness

Posted by in categories: business, military, satellites, science, security, space, surveillance

http://spacenews.com/planned-u-s-investment-in-space-awarene…PqrOS.dpuf

Oct 20, 2015

U.S. Air Force Assigns Two Block Buy Launches

Posted by in categories: government, military, science, space, weapons

http://spacenews.com/u-s-air-force-assigns-two-block-buy-launches/