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Archive for the ‘science’ category: Page 105

Feb 21, 2017

The science of why we experience false memories

Posted by in category: science

Sometimes we remember things that just didn’t happen — but we’re sure they did.

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Feb 21, 2017

NI Science Festival

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, food, neuroscience, quantum physics, science, space

Combines, space, poetry, optics, stories, TV, cognitive computing, atomic food safety, astrophysics and quantum biology in a fun-packed programme for everyone.

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Feb 21, 2017

Pres. Trump Chooses Science Advisor

Posted by in categories: chemistry, climatology, military, physics, science, space

Congrats Dr. Happer.


I’ve been waiting to find out who will be Pres. Trump’s science adviser. It appears to be physicist Dr. William Happer, a physicist currently teaching at Princeont University, and former Director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science from 1991–1993. He’s no slouch as a scientist. His work for the Air Force on the sodium guidestar laser platform for the military’s missile defense program provided information on the tropopause layer in the upper atmosphere, which is where atmospheric wave fronts distort both starlight and laser emissions, and where heat either begins to leak into space or does not, depending on how much and what kind of gas is blocking heat radiation.

The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere, where we live and where weather takes place, and the stratosphere. The layers above that are the stratosphere, where stratocirrus clouds form as floating clouds of ice, the mesosphere, the thermosphere and the top, very thin layer, the exosphere. Beyond that is space.

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Feb 18, 2017

2017 (Buckminster) Fuller Challenge Prize

Posted by in categories: complex systems, energy, engineering, environmental, futurism, innovation, science, sustainability

“Launched in 2007, the Fuller Challenge has defined an emerging field of practice: the whole systems approach to understanding and intervening in complex and interrelated crises for wide-scale social and environmental impact. The entry criteria have established a new framework through which to identify and measure effective, enduring solutions to global sustainability’s most entrenched challenges. The rigorous selection process has set a unique standard, gaining renown as “Socially-Responsible Design’s Highest Award.”

The Fuller Challenge attracts bold, visionary, tangible initiatives focused on a well-defined need of critical importance. Winning solutions are regionally specific yet globally applicable and present a truly comprehensive, anticipatory, integrated approach to solving the world’s complex problems.”

Deadline is March 31, 2017

Feb 11, 2017

Self-driving cars will create organ shortage — can science meet demand?

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, biotech/medical, robotics/AI, science

It looks like Self Driving cars may create a US organ shortage that finally acts as the Kick in the Ass to force stem cell generated organs on to the market. Enough of the ‘in the future’ we might have these Nonsesne.


Science, however, can offer better a better solution.

The waiting lists for donor organs are long — 120,000 people on a given day — and ever increasing. With fewer donor organs to go around, researchers are working on other ways to get people the parts they need. With help from 3D printing and other bioengineering technologies, we will eventually be able to grow our own organs and stop relying on donors.

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Feb 9, 2017

Bizarre new helium compound may rewrite science books

Posted by in categories: chemistry, education, particle physics, science

At school you may have been taught that helium was a noble gas because it was totally unreactive.

But, new research suggests it might not be as virtuous as we first thought.

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Feb 7, 2017

Genetics Is Giving Way to a New Science of Life

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, genetics, science

By Jonathan Latham, PhD

Test your understanding of the living world with this simple question. What kind of biomolecule is found in all living organisms? If your answer is “DNA”, you are incorrect. The mistake is very forgiveable though. The standard English-language biology education casts DNA (DeoxyriboNucleic Acid) as the master molecule of life, coordinating and controlling most, if not all, living functions. This master molecule concept is popular. It is plausible. It is taught in every university and high school. But it is wrong. DNA is no master controller, nor is it even at the centre of biology. Instead, science overwhelmingly shows that life is self-organised and thus the pieces are in place for biology to undergo the ultimate paradigm shift.

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Feb 7, 2017

Microsoft helps science, open sources their cloud-based tool for biological research

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, quantum physics, science

Off to the races again; hope folks are onboard. Quantum Bio will grow in importance; and you were warned.


Microsoft today announced that they have open sourced Bio Model Analyzer, a cloud-based tool which allows for biologists to model cell interaction and communication. This latest move is one of the many Microsoft Research initiatives which aims to help lab experts use computer science to speed up breakthroughs in cancer research and treatment.

According to the post, the Bio Model Analzyer (BMA) allows for researchers and science to compare the normal processes of healthy cells to the abnormal processes that occur when disease infects the body. Set against more traditional methods, when using computers, researchers can quickly explore many more possibilities than were previously possible. Jasmin Fisher, a Senior researcher in the programming principles and tools group in Microsoft’s Cambridge, U.K explains in the post:

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Jan 24, 2017

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative’s AI Acquisition Will Make Science Free for All

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI, science

Back in September, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative – the philanthropic company set up by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan – set a goal to invest $3 billion to cure, prevent, and manage disease by the end of the century.

The company has taken a huge first step toward the objective by partnering with scientists, doctors, engineers, and other key stakeholders. With the acquisition of Toronto-based company, Meta, the team is moving even closer to their goal by creating tools and technology designed to empower the scientific community.

Meta is a research paper search engine that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver the most relevant results to researchers. Following this acquisition, the Chan Zuckerberg initiative will enhance the service before eventually rolling it out for free.

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Jan 18, 2017

China’s quantum science satellite begins ‘spooky’ and ‘unhackable’ experiments

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, quantum physics, satellites, science

Hope folks are realizing this is happening and now real. Not sure what experiments their doing as they have already been experimenting already on hacking.


The world’s first quantum science and communications satellite has been handed over to Chinese scientists for the official start of experiments to test the phenomena of quantum entanglement and ‘unhackable’ quantum communication.

The Quantum Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS) satellite was launched on August 15 last year and soon after began testing its payloads and space-to-ground links.

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