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Archive for the ‘physics’ category

Feb 7, 2023

Arrows of Time

Posted by in categories: alien life, physics

The human mind has long grappled with the elusive nature of time: what it is, how to record it, how it regulates life, and whether it exists as a fundamental building block of the universe. This timeline traces our evolving understanding of time through a history of observations in CULTURE, PHYSICS, TIMEKEEPING and BIOLOGY.

Australia’s first inhabitants, the ancestors of today’s aboriginal peoples, are believed to have embraced a timeless view of nature, in which the present and past are intimately connected. The spirits of long-dead ancestors, for example, were believed to inhabit the living. These spirits reflected a long-ago golden age sometimes known as the Dreamtime.

Feb 7, 2023

How Maxwell’s Demon Continues to Startle Scientists

Posted by in category: physics

The thorny thought experiment has been turned into a real experiment — one that physicists use to probe the physics of information.

Feb 7, 2023

How Our Reality May Be a Sum of All Possible Realities

Posted by in category: physics

Richard Feynman’s path integral is both a powerful prediction machine and a philosophy about how the world is. But physicists are still struggling to figure out how to use it, and what it means.

Feb 4, 2023

Future World: A Million Years Later — Artificial Intelligence Tech That Will Change The Universe

Posted by in categories: business, cosmology, mathematics, physics, robotics/AI, space travel

Find out what the world will be like a million years from now, as well as what kind of technology we’ll have available.
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Timestamps:
0:00 No Physical Bodies.
1:51 Wormhole Creation.
2:44 Travel At Speed Of Light.
3:21 Type 3 Civilization.
4:52 Gravitational Waves.
5:46 Computers the Size of Planets.
6:56 Computronium.

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Feb 3, 2023

The Coming Consciousness Explosion | Dr. Ben Goertzel | SCS2022

Posted by in categories: finance, health, mathematics, physics, robotics/AI, singularity, transhumanism

Dr. Ben Goertzel.
SingularityNET

The Coming Consciousness Explosion.

Continue reading “The Coming Consciousness Explosion | Dr. Ben Goertzel | SCS2022” »

Feb 2, 2023

When your supernova’s a dud: Rare binary star features weirdly round orbit, researchers report

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

After crunching a mountain of astronomy data, Clarissa Pavao, an undergraduate at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Prescott, Arizona campus, submitted her preliminary analysis. Her mentor’s response was swift and in all-caps: “THERE’S AN ORBIT!” he wrote.

That was when Pavao, a senior space physics major, realized she was about to become a part of something big—a paper in the journal Nature that describes a rare binary star system with uncommon features.

The paper, published on Feb. 1, 2023, and co-authored with Dr. Noel D. Richardson, assistant professor of Physics and Astronomy at Embry-Riddle, describes a twin-star system that is luminous with X-rays and high in mass. Featuring a weirdly circular orbit—an oddity among binaries—the twin system seems to have formed when an or supernova fizzled out without the usual bang, similar to a dud firecracker.

Feb 2, 2023

Numerical simulations of planetesimal formation reproduce key properties of asteroids, comets

Posted by in categories: physics, space

With simulations that go into finer details than ever before, Brooke Polak of the University of Heidelberg and Hubert Klahr at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) have modeled a key phase in the formation of planets in our solar system: the way that centimeter-size pebbles aggregate into so-called planetesimals tens to hundreds kilometers in size. The simulation reproduces the initial size distribution of planetesimals, which can be checked against observations of present-day asteroids. It also predicts the prevalence of close binary planetesimals in our solar system.

In a new study published on arXiv and accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal, astrophysicists Brooke Polak from the University of Heidelberg and Hubert Klahr from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy used simulations to derive key properties of so-called planetesimals—the intermediate-size bodies from which planets formed in our solar system roughly 4.5 billion years ago.

Using an innovative method for simulating planetesimal formation, the two researchers were able to predict the initial size distribution of planetesimals in our solar system: how many are likely to have formed in the different “size brackets” between roughly 10 km and 200 km.

Feb 1, 2023

Physicists Are Pretty Damn Sure We Can Travel Faster Than the Speed of Light, Research Shows

Posted by in category: physics

How messy does spacetime get if we take our shuttle up to warp speed like in Star Trek? Is everything suddenly in multiple places at once?

Jan 31, 2023

DeepMind’s ChatGPT-Like AI Writes Amazing Screenplays!

Posted by in categories: entertainment, physics, robotics/AI

❤️ Check out Weights & Biases and sign up for a free demo here: https://wandb.com/papers.

📝 The paper “Co-Writing Screenplays and Theatre Scripts with Language Models: An Evaluation by Industry Professionals” is available here:
https://deepmind.github.io/dramatron/details.html.

Continue reading “DeepMind’s ChatGPT-Like AI Writes Amazing Screenplays!” »

Jan 30, 2023

A computer scientist explains why even AI has computational limits

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, physics, robotics/AI

There are two aspects to a computer’s power: the number of operations its hardware can execute per second and the efficiency of the algorithms it runs. The hardware speed is limited by the laws of physics. Algorithms—basically sets of instructions —are written by humans and translated into a sequence of operations that computer hardware can execute. Even if a computer’s speed could reach the physical limit, computational hurdles remain due to the limits of algorithms.

These hurdles include problems that are impossible for computers to solve and problems that are theoretically solvable but in practice are beyond the capabilities of even the most powerful versions of today’s computers imaginable. Mathematicians and computer scientists attempt to determine whether a problem is solvable by trying them out on an imaginary machine.

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