Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘nuclear energy’ category: Page 63

Nov 7, 2015

World’s Largest Fusion Reactor is About to Switch On

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

If “The Stellarator” sounds like an energy source of comic book legend to you, you’re not that far off. It’s the largest nuclear fusion reactor in the world, and it’s set to turn on later this month.

Housed at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator looks more like a psychotic giant’s art project than the future of energy. Especially when you compare it with the reactor’s symmetrical, donut-shaped cousin, the tokamak. But stellarators and tokamaks work according to similar principles: In both cases, coiled superconductors are used to create a powerful magnetic cage, which serves to contain a gas as it’s heated to the ungodly temperatures needed for hydrogen atoms to fuse.

Continue reading “World’s Largest Fusion Reactor is About to Switch On” »

Nov 3, 2015

Professor Kaku strikes again

Posted by in categories: military, mobile phones, nuclear energy, space, supercomputing

Read more

Nov 3, 2015

World’s Largest Nuclear Fusion Reactor

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, supercomputing

This is the world’s largest nuclear fusion reactor launching this month in Germany. And it was designed by a supercomputer…

Read more

Oct 30, 2015

Germany is about to start up a monster machine that could revolutionize the way we use energy

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, physics, singularity

This is the energy source that will power the Singularity.

And everything else, too.

Continue reading “Germany is about to start up a monster machine that could revolutionize the way we use energy” »

Oct 28, 2015

‘Stellarator’ Reactor’s Strange Twisted Design Can Finally Make Fusion Power A Reality

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

Researchers are getting ready to turn on the world’s biggest ‘Stellarator’ fusion reactor. Called Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), the reactor can uninterruptedly contain super-hot plasma for more than 30 minutes at a time. Scientists claim the rare design, which is contained in a giant lab in Greifswald, Germany, can finally help make fusion power a reality. Comprising super-hot plasma for long durations has been the Holy Grail for nuclear reactor designs, and can help researchers to deliver an inexhaustible source of power. Fusion reactors, for instance the W7-X, work by using two isotopes of hydrogen atoms — deuterium and tritium — and inserting that gas into a restraint vessel. Researcher then add energy that eliminates the electrons from their host atoms, creating what is described as an ion plasma, which discharges enormous amounts of energy.

Read more

Oct 23, 2015

Feature: The bizarre reactor that might save nuclear fusion

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

Some nice photos of odd-looking components.


Germany’s new stellarator was “hell on Earth” to build, but it will be worth it—if it works.

Read more

Oct 18, 2015

Amazing promises of nuclear fusion: How close are we?

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, sustainability

“Tens of billions of dollars have been spent in the past 60 years, entire careers have been invested, but the ability to produce a commercially viable nuclear fusion reactor remains undemonstrated.”


For 60 years the world’s been waiting for cheap, clean, safe, sustainable power from nuclear fusion. Are we there yet?

Read more

Oct 14, 2015

If it works, this could power everything

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

The sun powers itself through nuclear fusion. CNN’s Rachel Crane explores whether we could power everything on Earth the same way.

Read more

Oct 8, 2015

Fusion reactors ‘economically viable’ in a few decades, say experts

Posted by in categories: engineering, nuclear energy

An illustration of a tokamak with plasma (credit: ITER Organization)

Fusion reactors could become an economically viable means of generating electricity within a few decades, replacing conventional nuclear power stations, according to new research at Durham University and Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in Oxfordshire, U.K.

The research, published in the journal Fusion Engineering and Design, builds on earlier findings that a fusion power plant could generate electricity at a price similar to that of a fission plant and identifies new advantages in using new superconductor technology.

Read more

Sep 26, 2015

Small-scale nuclear fusion may be a new energy source

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

Fusion energy may soon be used in small-scale power stations. This means producing environmentally friendly heating and electricity at a low cost from fuel found in water. Both heating generators and generators for electricity could be developed within a few years, according to research that has primarily been conducted at the University of Gothenburg.

Nuclear fusion is a process whereby atomic nuclei melt together and release energy. Because of the low binding energy of the tiny atomic nuclei, energy can be released by combining two small nuclei with a heavier one. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Gothenburg and the University of Iceland has been to study a new type of nuclear fusion process. This produces almost no neutrons but instead fast, heavy electrons (muons), since it is based on nuclear reactions in ultra-dense heavy hydrogen (deuterium).

“This is a considerable advantage compared to other nuclear fusion processes which are under development at other research facilities, since the neutrons produced by such processes can cause dangerous flash burns,” says Leif Holmlid, Professor Emeritus at the University of Gothenburg.

Read more

Page 63 of 67First6061626364656667