Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘mobile phones’ category: Page 110

Jun 4, 2016

A Camera Lens Breakthrough Could See Smartphones Outperforming DSLRs

Posted by in categories: electronics, mobile phones

If you’ve ever held a high-quality camera lens, the first thing you notice is the weight. Thanks to layers and layers of thick glass hunks inside, they end up being very heavy. However, thanks to research being done at Harvard on something called metalenses, one day those mgiant glass-filled lenses might be obsolete.

The curved surfaces on a glass lens focus incoming light onto a camera’s digital sensor. The more precise (and expensive) the lens is, the better the image it will produce.

Metalenses work in a similar way, but they’re not made of precision-ground glass. Instead, a layer of transparent quartz is completely covered in a layer of tiny towers made from titanium dioxide. When arranged in specific patterns, those complex tower arrays can focus light exactly like a glass lens does. Except that these tiny metalenses end up being thinner than a human hair, and weigh almost nothing.

Continue reading “A Camera Lens Breakthrough Could See Smartphones Outperforming DSLRs” »

Jun 3, 2016

Scalable semipolar gallium nitride templates for high-speed LEDs

Posted by in categories: materials, mobile phones

Nice!


Metal organic vapor phase deposition on etched 4-inch-diameter sapphire wafers is used to create low-defect-density gallium nitride templates.

Continue reading “Scalable semipolar gallium nitride templates for high-speed LEDs” »

Jun 2, 2016

Intel’s new consumer head dreams of building JARVIS

Posted by in categories: business, computing, mobile phones, robotics/AI, wearables

Intel is in the midst of its biggest business transition ever. Just a few months ago, the chip giant announced that it would be laying off 11,000 workers and taking a step away from the PC market. Instead, it’ll be focusing on wearables and IoT devices. Coinciding with those announcements was an executive shuffle that put Navin Shenoy, its Mobile Client VP, in charge of its wider Client Computing Group (which covers all consumer devices). At Computex this week, we had a chance to pick Shenoy’s brain about Intel’s path forward.

Taiwan Computex

What do you envision being the next major breakthrough for PC form factor?

Continue reading “Intel’s new consumer head dreams of building JARVIS” »

Jun 1, 2016

Solid-state physics: Probing the geometry of energy bands

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, particle physics, quantum physics

Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) have devised a new interferometer to probe the geometry of band structures.

The geometry and topology of electronic states in solids play a central role in a wide range of modern condensed-matter systems, including graphene and topological insulators. However, experimentally accessing this information has proven to be challenging, especially when the bands are not well isolated from one another. As reported by Tracy Li et al. in last week’s issue of Science (Science, May 27, 2016, DOI: 10.1126/science.aad5812), an international team of researchers led by Professor Immanuel Bloch and Dr. Ulrich Schneider at LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics has devised a straightforward method with which to probe band geometry using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Their method, which combines the controlled transport of atoms through the energy bands with atom interferometry, is an important step in the endeavor to investigate geometric and topological phenomena in synthetic band structures.

A wide array of fundamental issues in condensed-matter physics, such as why some materials are insulators while others are metals, can be understood simply by examining the energies of the material’s constituent electrons. Indeed, band theory, which describes these electron energies, was one of the earliest triumphs of quantum mechanics, and has driven many of the technological advances of our time, from the computer chips in our laptops to the liquid-crystal displays on our smartphones. We now know, however, that traditional band theory is incomplete.

Continue reading “Solid-state physics: Probing the geometry of energy bands” »

Jun 1, 2016

Samsung’s new 512GB SSD is smaller than a postage stamp

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics, mobile phones

Storage in your laptop or smartphone is a compromise between volume, access speed and physical size. But, the industry’s competition to shrink them while boosting their specifications is fierce. A few months after shipping a 16TB solid-state drive, Samsung has announced a fast, efficient 512GB SSD that’s half the size of a postage stamp.

Samsung’s press release claims that the drive is the first mass-produced 512GB SSD with non-volatile memory express (NVMe), a host-controller interface with a streamlined register for speed, in a single package. Unlike other hard drives in multi-chip packages (MCP), Samsung’s new drive is organized in a ball grid array into a collected unit, making it simpler to fit in and connect to other parts in the device. This makes the drive ideal for the ultra-slim notebook PC market, where space and weight are at a premium.

A senior Samsung VP said in a press release that the tiny drive triples the performance of a typical SATA SSD. Its read/write speeds of up to 1,500MB/s and 900MB/s, respectively, mean you could transfer a 5GB HD video in 3 seconds. Samsung will start selling the drive in June in 512GB, 256GB and 128GB models.

Continue reading “Samsung’s new 512GB SSD is smaller than a postage stamp” »

Jun 1, 2016

Researchers create high-speed electronics for your skin

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, electronics, habitats, internet, mobile phones, wearables

Make no mistake, today’s wearables are clever pieces of kit. But they can be bulky and restricted by the devices they must be tethered to. This has led engineers to create thinner and more powerful pieces of wearable technology that can be applied directly to the skin. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, led by Zhenqiang “Jack” Ma, have developed “the world’s fastest stretchable, wearable integrated circuits,” that could let hospitals apply a temporary tattoo and remove the need for wires and clips.

With its snake-like shape, the new platform supports frequencies in the .3 gigahertz to 300 gigahertz range. This falls in what is set to become the 5G standard. For a mobile phone, 5G enables faster speeds and greater coverage, but with epidermal electronics, engineers have discussed the possibility that wearers could transmit their vitals to a doctor without having to leave their home.

While the idea isn’t unique, the integrated circuits created by Ma and his team have a much smaller footprint than those developed by other researchers. Earlier transmission lines can measure up to 640 micrometers (or .64 millimeters), but UW–Madison’s solution is just 25 micrometers (or .025 millimeters) thick. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research also supports Ma’s research, suggesting that his wearable breakthroughs may help pilots of the future.

Continue reading “Researchers create high-speed electronics for your skin” »

May 31, 2016

For $20M, These Israeli Hackers Will Spy On Any Phone On The Planet

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, surveillance

The latest surveillance tech from Israel “will open a new era in data interception,” says the CEO of profitable but troubled snoop supplier Ability. It’s sitting on the “golden key of surveillance” with a $20M product.

Read more

May 28, 2016

Mind Over Matter

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, mobile phones, virtual reality

Soon in the future, we will not need smartphones, or AR/ VR headsets, and other devices with BMI technology.


Tom Shippey reviews “The God Wave” by Patrick Hemstreet.

Read more

May 27, 2016

The Future of Humanity’s Food Supply Is in the Hands of AI

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, food, health, information science, mobile phones, robotics/AI, satellites

Perhaps it’s serendipitous, then, that the machines have finally arrived. Truly smart, truly impressive robots and machine learning algorithms that may help usher in a new Green Revolution to keep humans fed on an increasingly mercurial planet. Think satellites that automatically detect drought patterns, tractors that eyeball plants and kill the sick ones, and an AI-powered smartphone app that can tell a farmer what disease has crippled their crop.

Forget scarecrows. The future of agriculture is in the hands of the machines.

A Digital Green Thumb

Continue reading “The Future of Humanity’s Food Supply Is in the Hands of AI” »

May 27, 2016

Project Goa Will Bring Virtual Reality To Any Smartphone

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, virtual reality

And it’s not made of cardboard.

Read more