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Archive for the ‘mathematics’ category: Page 49

Aug 24, 2016

What would you say if I told you that aging happens not because of accumulation of stresses, but rather because of the intrinsic properties of the gene network of the organism?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, law, life extension, mathematics

I’m guessing you’d be like: surprised .

So, here’s the deal. My biohacker friends led by Peter Fedichev and Sergey Filonov in collaboration with my old friend and the longevity record holder Robert Shmookler Reis published a very cool paper. They proposed a way to quantitatively describe the two types of aging – negligible senescence and normal aging. We all know that some animals just don’t care about time passing by. Their mortality doesn’t increase with age. Such negligibly senescent species include the notorious naked mole rat and a bunch of other critters like certain turtles and clams to name a few. So the paper explains what it is exactly that makes these animals age so slowly – it’s the stability of their gene networks.

What does network stability mean then? Well, it’s actually pretty straightforward – if the DNA repair mechanisms are very efficient and the connectivity of the network is low enough, then this network is stable. So, normally aging species, such as ourselves, have unstable networks. This is a major bummer by all means. But! There is a way to overcome this problem, according to the proposed math model.

Continue reading “What would you say if I told you that aging happens not because of accumulation of stresses, but rather because of the intrinsic properties of the gene network of the organism?” »

Aug 24, 2016

Scientists Develop DNA Analog Circuit Which Performs Mathematical Calculations In A Test Tube

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, mathematics

Luv it!


There’s quite a lot of other things we don’t know DNA are being used for, like solving math problems for one.

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Aug 22, 2016

Like Liked UnlikeA New Approach To the Hard Problem of Consciousness: A Quasicrystalline Language of “Primitive Units of Consciousness” In Quantized SpacetimeLike

Posted by in categories: mathematics, neuroscience, physics

The hard problem of consciousness must be approached through the ontological lens of 20th century physics, which tells us that reality is information theoretic and quantized at the level of Planck scale spacetime. Through careful deduction, it becomes clear that information cannot exist without consciousness – the awareness of things. And to be aware is to hold the meaning of relationships of objects within consciousness – perceiving abstract objects, while enjoying degrees of freedom within the structuring of those relationships. This defines consciousness as language – a set of objects and an ordering scheme with degrees of freedom used for expressing meaning. And since even information at the Planck scale cannot exist without consciousness, we propose an entity called a “primitive unit of consciousness”, which acts as a mathematical operator in a quantized spacetime language. Quasicrystal mathematics based on E8 geometry seems to be a candidate for the language of reality, possessing several qualities corresponding to recent physical discoveries and various physically realistic unification models.

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Aug 19, 2016

How spacetime is built by quantum entanglement

Posted by in categories: mathematics, quantum physics, space

A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how spacetime emerges from quantum entanglement in a more fundamental theory. The paper announcing the discovery by Hirosi Ooguri, a Principal Investigator at the University of Tokyo’s Kavli IPMU, with Caltech mathematician Matilde Marcolli and graduate students Jennifer Lin and Bogdan Stoica, will be published in Physical Review Letters as an Editors’ Suggestion “for the potential interest in the results presented and on the success of the paper in communicating its message, in particular to readers from other fields.”

Physicists and mathematicians have long sought a Theory of Everything (ToE) that unifies and quantum mechanics. General relativity explains gravity and large-scale phenomena such as the dynamics of stars and galaxies in the universe, while quantum mechanics explains microscopic phenomena from the subatomic to molecular scales.

The holographic principle is widely regarded as an essential feature of a successful Theory of Everything. The holographic principle states that gravity in a three-dimensional volume can be described by quantum mechanics on a two-dimensional surface surrounding the volume. In particular, the three dimensions of the volume should emerge from the two dimensions of the surface. However, understanding the precise mechanics for the emergence of the volume from the surface has been elusive.

Continue reading “How spacetime is built by quantum entanglement” »

Aug 15, 2016

The Future Of Roads Could Mean Cars Not Having To Stop At Intersections

Posted by in categories: mathematics, transportation

Researchers at MIT and ETHZ have developed a working mathematical model for slot-based intersections. If successful, traffic efficiency would double and pollution would be greatly reduced.

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Jul 28, 2016

Moving beyond semiconductors for next-generation electric switches

Posted by in categories: energy, mathematics, mobile phones, quantum physics, supercomputing

Computers use switches to perform calculations. A complex film with “quantum wells”—regions that allow electron motion in only two dimensions—can be used to make efficient switches for high-speed computers. For the first time, this oxide film exhibited a phenomenon, called resonant tunneling, in which electrons move between quantum wells at a specific voltage. This behavior allowed an extremely large ratio (about 100,000:1) between two states, which can be used in an electronic device as an ON/OFF switch to perform mathematical calculations (Nature Communications, “Resonant tunneling in a quantum oxide superlattice”).

Quantum wells

Efficient control of electron motion can be used to reduce the power requirements of computers. “Quantum wells” (QW) are regions that allow electron motion in only two dimensions. The lines (bottom) in the schematic show the probability of finding electrons in the structure. The structure is a complex oxide (top) with columns (stacked blue dots corresponding to an added element) where the electrons are free to move in only two dimensions. This is a special type of quantum well called a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). (Image: Ho Nyung Lee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

Continue reading “Moving beyond semiconductors for next-generation electric switches” »

Jul 26, 2016

Can a Brain Scan Tell What You’re Thinking? — Pacific Standard

Posted by in categories: mathematics, neuroscience, space travel

Ever really wanted to know what folks truly are thinking about?


A new experiment advances the idea that brain scans can teach us something about how the human mind works.

By Nathan Collins

Continue reading “Can a Brain Scan Tell What You’re Thinking? — Pacific Standard” »

Jul 23, 2016

Scientists work toward storing digital information in DNA

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, education, mathematics

Her computer, Karin Strauss says, contains her “digital attic”—a place where she stores that published math paper she wrote in high school, and computer science schoolwork from college.

She’d like to preserve the stuff “as long as I live, at least,” says Strauss, 37. But computers must be replaced every few years, and each time she must copy the information over, “which is a little bit of a headache.”

It would be much better, she says, if she could store it in DNA—the stuff our genes are made of.

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Jul 19, 2016

Will Computers Redefine the Roots of Math?

Posted by in categories: computing, mathematics

When a legendary mathematician found a mistake in his own work, he embarked on a computer-aided quest to eliminate human error. To succeed, he has to rewrite the century-old rules underlying all of mathematics.

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Jul 18, 2016

No Man’s Sky will have a soundtrack written by algorithms

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, media & arts

Music for the game is ‘procedurally’ generated as players move through its universe.

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