Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘mathematics’ category: Page 35

Feb 23, 2017

Playing favorites: Brain cells prefer one parent’s gene over the other’s

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, mathematics, neuroscience

Well, in my immediate family; we get science, math, and futurists talents from my dad. And, there does seem to be a pattern in my immediate family with this; not sure about others. Would love to know though.


SALT LAKE CITY — Most kids say they love their mom and dad equally, but there are times when even the best prefers one parent over the other. The same can be said for how the body’s cells treat our DNA instructions. It has long been thought that each copy — one inherited from mom and one from dad — is treated the same. A new study from scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine shows that it is not uncommon for cells in the brain to preferentially activate one copy over the other. The finding breaks basic tenants of classic genetics and suggests new ways in which genetic mutations might cause brain disorders.

In at least one region of the newborn mouse brain, the new research shows, inequality seems to be the norm. About 85 percent of genes in the dorsal raphe nucleus, known for secreting the mood-controlling chemical serotonin, differentially activate their maternal and paternal gene copies. Ten days later in the juvenile brain, the landscape shifts, with both copies being activated equally for all but 10 percent of genes.

Continue reading “Playing favorites: Brain cells prefer one parent’s gene over the other’s” »

Feb 21, 2017

Quantum Systems, Channels, Information: A Mathematical Introduction [Repost]

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, mathematics, quantum physics

Published: 2012/11/01 | ISBN: 311027325X | PDF | 349 pages | 12.06 MB

The subject of this book is theory of quantum system presented from information science perspective. The central role is played by the concept of quantum channel and its entropic and information characteristics. Quantum information theory gives a key to understanding elusive phenomena of quantum world and provides a background for development of experimental techniques that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems. This is important for the new efficient applications such as quantum computing, communication and cryptography. Research in the field of quantum informatics, including quantum information theory, is in progress in leading scientific centers throughout the world. This book gives an accessible, albeit mathematically rigorous and self-contained introduction to quantum information theory, starting from primary structures and leading to fundamental results and to exiting open problems.

Read more

Feb 14, 2017

Brand New Maths Could Finally Explain How Disturbances Propagate Through Space-Time

Posted by in categories: cosmology, mathematics, physics

The Universe as we know it is made up of a continuum of space and time — a space-time fabric that’s curved by massive objects such as stars and black holes, and which dictates the movement of matter.

Thanks to Einstein’s gravitational waves, we know disturbances can propagate through both space and time. But what’s less understood is exactly how that happens when properties of the fabric is continuously shifting.

Continue reading “Brand New Maths Could Finally Explain How Disturbances Propagate Through Space-Time” »

Feb 13, 2017

Will androids dream of quantum sheep?

Posted by in categories: mathematics, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Quantum replicants of responsive systems can be more efficient than classical models, say researchers from the Centre for Quantum Technologies in Singapore, because classical models have to store more past information than is necessary to simulate the future. They have published their findings in npj Quantum Information.

The word ‘replicant’ evokes thoughts of a sci-fi world where society has replaced common creatures with artificial machines that replicate their behaviour. Now researchers from Singapore have shown that if such machines are ever created, they’ll run more efficiently if they harness theory to respond to the environment.

This follows the findings of a team from the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), published 10 February in npj Quantum Information. The team investigated ‘input-output processes’, assessing the mathematical framework used to describe arbitrary devices that make future decisions based on stimuli received from the environment. In almost all cases, they found, a quantum device is more efficient because classical devices have to store more past information than is necessary to simulate the future.

Continue reading “Will androids dream of quantum sheep?” »

Feb 12, 2017

Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Create a Super-Fast ‘Biological Computer’

Posted by in categories: biological, mathematics, nanotechnology, supercomputing

In Brief:

Researchers found a new “supercomputer” using nanotechnology. These biocomputers can solve mathematical problems faster, and they are more energy efficient.

Continue reading “Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Create a Super-Fast ‘Biological Computer’” »

Feb 6, 2017

Tesla and Scalar Energy Explained

Posted by in categories: energy, mathematics, quantum physics

Nice write up and anyone working or researching central nervous system should not find this research and findings shocking.


Re: Scam hunter’s question; “Can you explain what a scalar torsion field model is?”

The History of Scalar Energy

Continue reading “Tesla and Scalar Energy Explained” »

Feb 6, 2017

Quantum cognition

Posted by in categories: mathematics, neuroscience, quantum physics

Quantum Cognition — recently published as a new field term for cognitive thinking.


Quantum cognition is an emerging field which applies the mathematical formalism of quantum theory to model cognitive phenomena such as information processing by the human brain, language, decision making, human memory, concepts and conceptual reasoning, human judgment, and perception. [1][2][3][4] The field clearly distinguishes itself from the quantum mind as it is not reliant on the hypothesis that there is something micro-physical quantum mechanical about the brain. Quantum cognition is based on the quantum-like paradigm[5][6] or generalized quantum paradigm [7] or quantum structure paradigm [8] that information processing by complex systems such as the brain, taking into account contextual dependence of information and probabilistic reasoning, can be mathematically described in the framework of quantum information and quantum probability theory.

Quantum cognition uses the mathematical formalism of quantum theory to inspire and formalize models of cognition that aim to be an advance over models based on traditional classical probability theory. The field focuses on modeling phenomena in cognitive science that have resisted traditional techniques or where traditional models seem to have reached a barrier (e.g., human memory [9]), and modeling preferences in decision theory that seem paradoxical from a traditional rational point of view (e.g., preference reversals [10]). Since the use of a quantum-theoretic framework is for modeling purposes, the identification of quantum structures in cognitive phenomena does not presuppose the existence of microscopic quantum processes in the human brain.

Read more

Feb 2, 2017

What Quantum Gravity Needs Is More Experiments

Posted by in categories: mathematics, particle physics, quantum physics

Agree; math is a must. However, experimentation is when the rubber meets the road.


In the mid-1990s, I studied mathematics. I wasn’t really sure just what I wanted to do with my life, but I was awed by the power of mathematics to describe the natural world. After classes on differential geometry and Lie algebras, I attended a seminar series offered by the math department about the greatest problem in fundamental physics: how to quantize gravity and thereby bring all the forces of nature under one theoretical umbrella. The seminars focused on a new approach pioneered by Abhay Ashtekhar at Penn State University. It wasn’t research I had previously encountered, and I came away with the impression that the problem had been solved; the news just hadn’t yet spread.

It seemed a clear victory for pure thought. The requirement of mathematical consistency also led, for example, to the discovery of the Higgs boson. Without the Higgs, the Standard Model of particle physics would stop working for particles that are collided at energies above 1 teraelectron-volts, well within the range of the Large Hadron Collider. Probabilities would no longer add to 100 percent and would cease to make mathematical sense. Something new thus had to turn up once that energy was crossed. The Higgs was the simplest possibility that physicists could think of—and, sure enough, they found it.

Continue reading “What Quantum Gravity Needs Is More Experiments” »

Jan 30, 2017

Physicists ‘have substantial evidence’ our universe is a HOLOGRAM

Posted by in categories: holograms, mathematics, physics

The researchers from the University of Southampton, working with colleagues in Canada and Italy, claim there is as much evidence for this theory as for traditional explanations for these irregularities.

A holographic universe, an idea first suggested in the 1990s, is one where all the information, which makes up our 3D ‘reality’is contained in a 2D surface on its boundaries.

Continue reading “Physicists ‘have substantial evidence’ our universe is a HOLOGRAM” »

Jan 26, 2017

The Futurist Sessions: Simulation Theory — ft. Keith Comito, Gray Scott, Luis Arana, and Zac Waldman

Posted by in categories: mathematics, quantum physics

A discussion about Simulation theory, quantum mechanics and Super Mario!


Futurists Keith Comito, Gray Scott, Luis Arana, and Zach Waldman talk about the simulation theory as part of the #FuturistSessions at the Soho House New York. Discussions include quantum mechanics, mathematical realism vs mathematical fictionalism, the Matrix, Pacman, and Mario!

Continue reading “The Futurist Sessions: Simulation Theory — ft. Keith Comito, Gray Scott, Luis Arana, and Zac Waldman” »

Page 35 of 44First3233343536373839Last