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Archive for the ‘materials’ category: Page 5

Apr 22, 2024

Scientists make first-ever functional graphene semiconductor

Posted by in categories: electronics, materials

Experts have been busy working on producing advanced materials for modern electronic devices to meet this escalating demand.

Now, a significant milestone in this endeavor has been achieved by a team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who have successfully engineered the world’s first functional semiconductor using graphene.

Apr 21, 2024

Exodus Propulsion Technologies Claims Huge Space Propulsion Breakthrough

Posted by in categories: materials, space

Dr. Charles Buhler and Exodus Technologies claims that systems with electrostatic pressure differences or electrostatic divergent fields gives systems with a center of mass with non-zero force component (aka generate movement). Buhler is NASA’s subject matter expert on electrostatics. They want to move to demo the system in orbit. These kinds of claims are controversial but the work seems to be thorough. It will only cost about $500k to $1M to create a rideshare mission into orbit to test the system. The mass of an early orbital system would greatly exceed the active materials of the propulsion, which would reduce performance. High performance space propulsion would need to increase the active materials as a percentage of the mass of the craft.

Dr. Charles Buhler discusses an experimental propulsion results based on asymmetrical electrostatic pressure, in a device described in International Patent# WO2020159603A2. The device is described as a system and method for generating a force from a voltage difference applied across at least one electrically conductive surface. The applied voltage difference creates an electric field resulting in an electrostatic pressure force acting on at least one surface of an object. Asymmetries in the resulting electrostatic pressure force vectors result in a net resulting electrostatic pressure force acting on the object. The magnitude of the net resulting electrostatic pressure force is a function of the geometry of the electrically conductive surfaces, the applied voltage, and the dielectric constant of any material present in the gap between electrodes.

Dr. Buhler has experience working with electrostatic discharge & ESD safety for the Space Shuttle Program, the International Space Station Program and the Hubble Space Telescope Program. He was also a Co-Investigator for three NASA Research Announcements funded by the Mars Exploration Program, and is currently working on NASA’s Dust Project focused on utilizing electrostatic methods to remove dust from personnel and equipment that will be sent to the Moon through NASA’s Constellation Program.

Apr 21, 2024

Meta’s New GenAI Is Theatrical. Here’s How To Make It Valuable

Posted by in categories: materials, robotics/AI

Concern about a generative AI bubble is growing. To defend against disillusionment, measure its concrete value.

Apr 21, 2024

MIT Unlocks the Power of 2D Magnets for Future Computing

Posted by in categories: materials, robotics/AI

MIT scientists have tackled key obstacles to bringing 2D magnetic materials into practical use, setting the stage for the next generation of energy-efficient computers.

Globally, computation is booming at an unprecedented rate, fueled by the boons of artificial intelligence. With this, the staggering energy demand of the world’s computing infrastructure has become a major concern, and the development of computing devices that are far more energy-efficient is a leading challenge for the scientific community.

Continue reading “MIT Unlocks the Power of 2D Magnets for Future Computing” »

Apr 21, 2024

Turbocharged Skyrmions: Accelerating Toward the Future of Computing

Posted by in categories: computing, materials

Scientists discovered that skyrmions, potential future bits for computer memory, can now move at speeds up to 900 m/s, a significant increase facilitated by the use of antiferromagnetic materials.

An international research team led by scientists from the CNRS[1] has discovered that the magnetic nanobubbles[2] known as skyrmions can be moved by electrical currents, attaining record speeds up to 900 m/s.

Anticipated as future bits in computer memory, these nanobubbles offer enhanced avenues for information processing in electronic devices. Their tiny size[3] provides great computing and information storage capacity, as well as low energy consumption.

Apr 20, 2024

Why it’s so hard for China’s chip industry to become self-sufficient

Posted by in categories: computing, materials

Chip companies from the US and China are developing new materials to reduce reliance on a Japanese monopoly. It won’t be easy.

Apr 20, 2024

Researchers develop sodium battery capable of rapid charging in just a few seconds

Posted by in categories: energy, materials

Sodium (Na), which is over 500 times more abundant than lithium (Li), has recently garnered significant attention for its potential in sodium-ion battery technologies. However, existing sodium-ion batteries face fundamental limitations, including lower power output, constrained storage properties, and longer charging times, necessitating the development of next-generation energy storage materials.

Apr 19, 2024

Physicists Created an Exotic Superconductor Controlled by Magnetism

Posted by in categories: materials, physics

Superconductivity continues to revolutionize technology in so many ways. While some technological advances rely on finding ways to encourage zero-resistance currents at warmer temperatures, engineers are also considering better ways of fine-controlling the super-efficient flow of electrons.

Unfortunately, many processes that would work just fine for run-of-the-mill electronics, such as the application of external magnetic fields, risk interfering with the properties that make superconductors so efficient.

An international team of scientists has succeeded in confining an exotic state of superconductivity that’s controlled by strong magnetism rather than disrupted by it.

Apr 19, 2024

Spintronics: A new path to room temperature swirling spin textures

Posted by in categories: materials, particle physics

In some materials, spins form complex magnetic structures within the nanometer and micrometer scale in which the magnetization direction twists and curls along specific directions. Examples of such structures are magnetic bubbles, skyrmions, and magnetic vortices.

Apr 19, 2024

New research could enable more—and more efficient—synthesis of metastable materials

Posted by in category: materials

Ion exchange is a powerful technique for converting one material to another when synthesizing new products. In this process, scientists know what reactants lead to what products, but how the process works—the exact pathway of how one material can be converted to another—has remained elusive.

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