Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘government’ category: Page 5

Aug 29, 2020

Since Tesla, engineers have dreamed of large-scale wireless power transmission

Posted by in categories: energy, government

Many have tried, none have succeeded in making it a practical success. Now New Zealand start-up Emrod says they are close.


Since the days of Nikola Tesla, engineers have tried to make it practical to transmit large amounts of electricity. A government-backed startup says they are close.

Continue reading “Since Tesla, engineers have dreamed of large-scale wireless power transmission” »

Aug 29, 2020

Up to three launches planned this weekend from Cape Canaveral

Posted by in categories: government, satellites

Up to three launches planned this weekend from Cape Canaveral – Spaceflight Now.


Delays have set up the possibility of up to three rocket launches this weekend from different pads along Florida’s Space Coast, including two SpaceX missions on Sunday that could set a company record for the shortest span between two Falcon 9 rocket launches.

But in the world of ever-changing launch schedules, numerous factors such as weather and technical issues could thwart launch plans this weekend.

Continue reading “Up to three launches planned this weekend from Cape Canaveral” »

Aug 29, 2020

Now is the time to bring in a Universal Basic Income

Posted by in categories: economics, government

It has taken a global crisis for the government to recognise the need for real social security.

Aug 29, 2020

Farmers urged to be prepared for future price volatility

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, government, neuroscience, policy

A worldwide pandemic, something that has not occurred for over 100 years is, without question, the story of the year. The impact and ripple effect may take years before analysts are comfortable with knowing what exactly happened. In an amazing effort to curb Covid-19 and keep world economics intact, the United States and foreign countries took extraordinary measures, most of which where thought of, designed, and implemented in days or weeks. There will be plenty of critics.

If the world emerges from this pandemic in the next 6 to 18 months, it will be because of a rapid response. Inflation could be an issue, yet monetary policy enacted was necessary to keep the world from falling into a depression. The issues that won’t be talked about are ones that never happened, thanks to aggressive government action.

In the commodity world, much like the equities, great uncertainty leads to wild volatility. Energy prices dropping into negative territory and milk prices dropping sharply only to rally to all-time new highs illustrate the dichotomy of just how demand (or perception thereof) ebbs and flows at unprecedented speeds. These are just two examples of many markets that experienced extreme price moves.

Continue reading “Farmers urged to be prepared for future price volatility” »

Aug 28, 2020

Robot Skin 3D Printer Close to First-in-Human Clinical Trials

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, government, health, robotics/AI

In just two years a robotic device that prints a patient’s own skin cells directly onto a burn or wound could have its first-in-human clinical trials. The 3D bioprinting system for intraoperative skin regeneration developed by Australian biotech start-up Inventia Life Science has gained new momentum thanks to major investments from the Australian government and two powerful new partners, world-renowned burns expert Fiona Wood and leading bioprinting researcher Gordon Wallace.

Codenamed Ligō from the Latin “to bind”, the system is expected to revolutionize wound repairs by delivering multiple cell types and biomaterials rapidly and precisely, creating a new layer of skin where it has been damaged. The novel system is slated to replace current wound healing methods that simply attempt to repair the skin, and is being developed by Inventia Skin, a subsidiary of Inventia Life Science.

“When we started Inventia Life Science, our vision was to create a technology platform with the potential to bring enormous benefit to human health. We are pleased to see how fast that vision is progressing alongside our fantastic collaborators. This Federal Government support will definitely help us accelerate even faster,” said Dr. Julio Ribeiro, CEO, and co-founder of Inventia.

Continue reading “Robot Skin 3D Printer Close to First-in-Human Clinical Trials” »

Aug 26, 2020

US announces $1 billion research push for AI and quantum computing

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, government, military, quantum physics, robotics/AI, sustainability

It’s extremely difficult to make a fair comparison of US and Chinese spend on technology like AI as funding and research in this area is diffuse. Although China announced ambitious plans to become the world leader in AI by 2030, America still outspends the country in military funding (which increasingly includes AI research), while US tech companies like Google and Microsoft remain world leaders in artificial intelligence.

The Trump administration will likely present today’s news as a counterbalance to its dismal reputation for supporting scientific research. For four years in a row, government budgets have proposed broad cuts for federal research, including work in pressing subjects like climate change. Only the fields of artificial intelligence and quantum computing, with their overt links to military prowess and global geopolitics, have seen increased investment.

“It is absolutely imperative the United States continues to lead the world in AI and quantum,” said US Chief Technology Officer Michael Kratsios ahead of today’s announcement, according to The Wall Street Journal. “The future of American economic prosperity and national security will be shaped by how we invest, research, develop and deploy these cutting edge technologies today.”

Continue reading “US announces $1 billion research push for AI and quantum computing” »

Aug 26, 2020

Intel Advances On The Road To Quantum Practicality

Posted by in categories: computing, education, government, quantum physics

Clarke urges other companies to also get ready now by investing in developing a quantum-ready workforce. “Quantum computing requires a specialized workforce, expertise that is pretty rare today,” he says. Clarke also advises companies to work with government agencies that are sponsoring quantum computing experiments and to fund quantum research in universities. He also supports nation-wide initiatives to spread the word all the way down the education system, even to high-school students, “so people aren’t scared or intimidated by the word quantum.”


Intel aims to achieve quantum practicality—commercially-viable quantum computing—by the end of this decade.

Continue reading “Intel Advances On The Road To Quantum Practicality” »

Aug 25, 2020

Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre reviews updates on Hope Probe and strategic plans

Posted by in categories: government, space

The Board of Directors of the Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Center, MBRSC, held a meeting chaired by Talal Humaid Belhoul, Vice President, MBRSC to discuss developments related to future projects at the Center, aligned with the strategic plan of the UAE’s National Space Program. The meeting was attended by Hamad Obaid Al Mansoori, Chairman, MBRSC, Yousuf Hamad AlShaibani, Director-General, MBRSC, along with the members of the Board of Directors, Mohammad Abdullah Alzaffin, Mansoor Juma Buosaiba, Mohamed Saif Al Meqbaali, and others.

During the meeting, Belhoul was briefed on the reports of the MBRSC’s current projects, strategy and plans that endeavor to support the country’s strategy in the space sector and its contributions to other sectors, within the UAE’s National Space Program. Belhoul appreciated the efforts of the work done by the team at the center and the support they provided to government agencies and vital sectors in the UAE.

Stressing on the importance of the Center’s role in actively contributing to the promotion of space exploration in the UAE, he said, “Space is a competitive arena for scientific knowledge, and we are proud that the UAE is one of nine countries in the world that has an active space program. We have achieved a lot in this short span, but we have much more to accomplish. We will work towards achieving the vision of the wise leadership of the UAE to be one of the leading countries in terms of knowledge and scientific achievements.”

Aug 24, 2020

Scientists Develop Nanophotonic 3D Printing for Virtual Reality Screens

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, government, mobile phones, nanotechnology, quantum physics, virtual reality, wearables

In Korea, scientists are turning to better ways for improving our screen time, and this means 3D printing something most of us know little about: quantum dots. Focusing on refining the wonders of virtual reality and other electronic displays even further, researchers from the Nano Hybrid Technology Research Center of Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), a government-funded research institute under National Research Council of Science & Technology (NST) of the Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT), have created nanophotonic 3D printing technology for screens. Meant to be used with virtual reality, as well as TVs, smartphones, and wearables, high resolution is achieved due to a 3D layout expanding the density and quality of the pixels.

Led by Dr. Jaeyeon Pyo and Dr. Seung Kwon Seol, the team has published the results of their research and development in “3D-Printed Quantum Dot Nanopixels.” While pixels are produced to represent data in many electronics, conventionally they are created with 2D patterning. To overcome limitations in brightness and resolution, the scientists elevated this previously strained technology to the next level with 3D printed quantum dots to be contained within polymer nanowires.

Aug 23, 2020

The term ‘ethical AI’ is finally starting to mean something

Posted by in categories: ethics, government, information science, robotics/AI

Since OpenAI first described its new AI language-generating system called GPT-3 in May, hundreds of media outlets (including MIT Technology Review) have written about the system and its capabilities. Twitter has been abuzz about its power and potential. The New York Times published an op-ed about it. Later this year, OpenAI will begin charging companies for access to GPT-3, hoping that its system can soon power a wide variety of AI products and services.


Earlier this year, the independent research organisation of which I am the Director, London-based Ada Lovelace Institute, hosted a panel at the world’s largest AI conference, CogX, called The Ethics Panel to End All Ethics Panels. The title referenced both a tongue-in-cheek effort at self-promotion, and a very real need to put to bed the seemingly endless offering of panels, think-pieces, and government reports preoccupied with ruminating on the abstract ethical questions posed by AI and new data-driven technologies. We had grown impatient with conceptual debates and high-level principles.

And we were not alone. 2020 has seen the emergence of a new wave of ethical AI – one focused on the tough questions of power, equity, and justice that underpin emerging technologies, and directed at bringing about actionable change. It supersedes the two waves that came before it: the first wave, defined by principles and dominated by philosophers, and the second wave, led by computer scientists and geared towards technical fixes. Third-wave ethical AI has seen a Dutch Court shut down an algorithmic fraud detection system, students in the UK take to the streets to protest against algorithmically-decided exam results, and US companies voluntarily restrict their sales of facial recognition technology. It is taking us beyond the principled and the technical, to practical mechanisms for rectifying power imbalances and achieving individual and societal justice.

Continue reading “The term ‘ethical AI’ is finally starting to mean something” »

Page 5 of 123First23456789Last