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Jan 25, 2024

Ingenuity is Over and Moon Sniper is On It’s Head

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, food, health

What brought the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter mission to and end and how did the Japanese Moon Snipper land on it’s head?

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Jan 25, 2024

Lifelike Einstein, Hawking could be college lecturers thanks to groundbreaking hologram technology

Posted by in categories: education, holograms

College students may soon be able to attend lectures given by long-dead pioneers like Albert Einstein and Coco Chanel thanks to groundbreaking hologram technology, according to a report.

Some universities have already begun using the holographic technology to bring some of the world’s greatest innovators and artists, like Michael Jackson, to the classroom, The Guardian reported.

The technology can also beam in 3D images of speakers from across the world.

Jan 25, 2024

A new collaboration with OpenAI charts the future of AI in higher education

Posted by in categories: education, robotics/AI

First such collaboration between a university and ChatGPT.

Jan 24, 2024

Amateur Scientist Teaches Rats to Take Selfies

Posted by in categories: education, food

If you give a rat a camera, it will apparently take selfies.

That was the biggest takeaway from a fresh riff on a classic rat experiment undertaken by French photographer and amateur behaviorist Augustin Lignier, who told the New York Times that when he taught some pet store rats how to take selfies using a lever that snapped a pic and rewarded them with some sugar, the photo-snapping continued even after the treats stopped.

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Jan 24, 2024

A Big Bang from a Quantum Quark?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, education, particle physics, quantum physics

The universe is governed by four known fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, the weak force, and the strong force. The strong force is responsible for dynamics on an extremely small scale, within and between the individual nucleons of atomic nuclei and between the constituents – quarks and gluons – that make up those nucleons. The strong force is described by a theory called Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One of the key details of this theory, known as “asymptotic freedom”, is responsible for both the subatomic scale of the strong force and the significant theoretical difficulties that the strong force has presented to physicists over the past 50 years.

Given the complexity of the strong force, experimental physicists have often led the research frontier and made discoveries that theorists are still trying to describe. This pattern is distinct from many other areas of physics, where experimentalists mostly search for and confirm, or exclude, theoretical predictions. One of the QCD areas where experimentalists have led progress is in the description of the collective behavior of systems with many bodies interacting via the strong force. An example of such a system is the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). A few microseconds after the Big Bang, the universe is supposed to have existed in such a state. The way the universe evolved in these brief moments and the structure that subsequently developed over billions of years is studied, in part, through experimental research on collective QCD effects. This briefing describes a recent exciting development in that research. To better understand the results, we begin with a series of analogies.

Imagine you are on a large university campus. You observe student movements in the middle of a busy exam period and find that the number of students entering the library in the morning is related to the number of students leaving in the evening. Perhaps this indicates some conserved quantity, like the number of students at the school. Each student in the library wants enough room to lay out their supplies and textbooks and get comfortable while studying. The library is nearly full and the students are evenly distributed across all the floors and halls of the library to ensure they have ample space. Recognizing and quantifying correlations like these can be useful for studying collective systems. By counting students “here” you can predict how many students are “there”, or by counting students “now” you can predict how many students you will get “later”. In this example, you may have insight into basic temporal and spatial correlations.

Jan 23, 2024

Google makes breakthrough in one of the hardest tests for AI

Posted by in categories: education, mathematics, robotics/AI

Google Deepmind says that a new artificial intelligence system has made a major breakthrough in one of the most difficult tests for AI.

The company says that it has created a new AI system that can solve geometry problems at the level of the very top high-school students.

Geometry is one of the oldest branches of mathematics, but has proven particularly difficult for AI systems to work with. It has been difficult to train them because of a lack of data, and succeeding requires building a system that can take on difficult logical challenges.

Jan 22, 2024

More Mars and Moon Water Found

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, health

See why new discoveries about water on Mars and water on the Moon are great news for the future of space settlement!

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Jan 20, 2024

Japan Lands on the Moon Peregrine Reenters Earth’s Atmosphere

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, food, health

Japan’s Moon Snipper Landed on the Moon making Japan the fifth nation to accomplish a lunar landing and Astrobiotic’s Peregrine lunar lander reenters Earth’s atmosphere.

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These statements and products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, prevent, or mitigate any disease.

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Jan 19, 2024

Sundance 2024: Generative AI Changes Brian Eno Documentary With Every View

Posted by in categories: education, robotics/AI

Eno, the career-spanning documentary about Brian Eno that premieres at the Sundance Film Festival, is a bracing dive into the brain of one of the most transformative musicians, producers and sound pioneers of the past half century.


‘Eno’ uses generative AI to create an always-changing, but compelling story about musician and producer Brian Eno.

Jan 19, 2024

Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, genetics

A genome-wide association study in 293,723 individuals identifies 74 genetic variants associated with educational attainment, which, although only explaining a small proportion of the variation in educational attainment, highlights candidate genes and pathways for further study.

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