Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 703

Sep 29, 2015

The Inside Story on Lightless, One of the Year’s Most Exciting New Space Operas!

Posted by in categories: computing, entertainment, space

The brand new space opera novel Lightless is a fast-paced, gripping read, and like all good science fiction, explores the human side of cutting-edge scientific concepts. We talked to debut author C.A. Higgins about using real physics in her story.

In Lightless, a prototype spaceship on its maiden voyage on behalf of a totalitarian regime is infiltrated by escaped terrorists. And it’s up to Althea, a socially awkward computer scientist who prefers the company of the Ananke’s disturbingly sentient electronic system to that of her crewmates, to save the day as her well-ordered world begins to unravel.

http://www.amazon.com/Lightless-C-A-Higgins/dp/0553394428?ta…9236004136

Read more

Sep 29, 2015

First optical ‘rectenna’ converts light to DC current

Posted by in category: computing

This schematic shows the components of the optical rectenna developed at the Georgia Institute of Technology (credit: Thomas Bougher, Georgia Tech)

Using nanometer-scale components, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have demonstrated the first optical rectenna, a device that combines the functions of an antenna and a rectifier diode to convert light directly into DC current.

Read more

Sep 28, 2015

Google, NASA sign 7-year deal to test D-Wave quantum computers as artificial brains

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, robotics/AI

The deal with D-Wave Systems will see a steady stream of D-Wave quantum chips used as the foundation of an artificial intelligence lab.

Read more

Sep 28, 2015

Intelligent machines: Making AI work in the real world — By Eric Schmidt | BBC News

Posted by in categories: big data, computing, innovation, machine learning, robotics/AI, software

_85351747_ericschmidt
“As part of the BBC’s Intelligent Machines season, Google’s Eric Schmidt has penned an exclusive article on how he sees artificial intelligence developing, why it is experiencing such a renaissance and where it will go next.”

Read more

Sep 28, 2015

Artificial Intelligence Must Answer to Its Creators

Posted by in categories: big data, computing, driverless cars, existential risks

Although it was made in 1968, to many people, the renegade HAL 9000 computer in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey still represents the potential danger of real-life artificial intelligence. However, according to Mathematician, Computer Visionary and Author Dr. John MacCormick, the scenario of computers run amok depicted in the film – and in just about every other genre of science fiction – will never happen.

“Right from the start of computing, people realized these things were not just going to be crunching numbers, but could solve other types of problems,” MacCormick said during a recent interview with TechEmergence. “They quickly discovered computers couldn’t do things as easily as they thought.”

While MacCormick is quick to acknowledge modern advances in artificial intelligence, he’s also very conscious of its ongoing limitations, specifically replicating human vision. “The sub-field where we try to emulate the human visual system turned out to be one of the toughest nuts to crack in the whole field of AI,” he said. “Object recognition systems today are phenomenally good compared to what they were 20 years ago, but they’re still far, far inferior to the capabilities of a human.”

To compensate for its limitations, MacCormick notes that other technologies have been developed that, while they’re considered by many to be artificially intelligent, don’t rely on AI. As an example, he pointed to Google’s self-driving car. “If you look at the Google self-driving car, the AI vision systems are there, but they don’t rely on them,” MacCormick said. “In terms of recognizing lane markings on the road or obstructions, they’re going to rely on other sensors that are more reliable, such as GPS, to get an exact location.”

Continue reading “Artificial Intelligence Must Answer to Its Creators” »

Sep 26, 2015

Let’s go inside Samsung’s new Silicon Valley headquarters

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones

While Apple has gone for a flying saucer design, Samsung’s new Silicon Valley offices look more like a giant Rubik’s Cube. The $300 million campus opened yesterday, cementing the South Korean company’s presence in the Valley. The 1.1 million-square-foot site in San Jose is intended to accommodate up to 2,000 employees, bringing together Samsung’s American R&D teams as well as providing a home for its local sales and marketing staff. Samsung says the site’s open design is intended to foster collaboration between employees, enabling those “impromptu, spur-of-the-moment interactions that are the genesis of many great ideas.”

The company broke ground on the 10-story campus back in 2013, with architecture firm NBBJ designing the site, which includes courtyards, open “garden floors,” and lab space. “Today represents a major milestone as we open our most strategically important Samsung facility in the US and also our biggest investment in Silicon Valley,” said Jaesoo Han, Samsung’s devices president in America, in a press statement. “Samsung’s goal is nothing less than to develop the best next‐generation technologies for device solutions.” Here’s how the new offices compare to the original renders:

Samsung is stressing that the site is a home for its R&D work, including research into products like displays, semiconductors, and SSD hard drives. However, the building also puts it on more of an equal footing with tech giants like Apple and Facebook, which have already established (or have plans for) monumental homes in Silicon Valley. Samsung may be facing hard times in the smartphone industry, the product category it’s most well known for in the US, but these new offices should give it a little more visibility in the tech world.

Read more

Sep 25, 2015

Watch: Paralysed man walks again via brain waves rerouted to his legs

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, neuroscience

A paraplegic man who was paralysed for five years has walked again on his own two feet, thanks to a new kind of brain-computer interface that can reroute his thoughts to his legs, bypassing his spinal cord entirely.

The anonymous man, who experiences complete paralysis in both legs due to a severe spinal cord injury (SCI), is the first such patient to demonstrate that brain-controlled overground walking after paraplegia due to SCI is feasible.

Continue reading “Watch: Paralysed man walks again via brain waves rerouted to his legs” »

Sep 24, 2015

Don’t Worry, Artificial Intelligence Has A Long Way To Go: Baidu Scientist

Posted by in categories: computing, employment, robotics/AI

Don’t get overly excited about computers and artificial intelligence replacing humans , at least not yet says Andrew Ng, chief scientist at the Chinese search giant Biadu. Computers are still in the “supervised learning” stage where human input is required to connect dots.

artificial intelligence AI Jobs

Read more

Sep 24, 2015

Brain-computer link enables paralyzed California man to walk

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, information science, neuroscience, robotics/AI

By Steve Gorman LOS ANGELES (Reuters) — A brain-to-computer technology that can translate thoughts into leg movements has enabled a man paralyzed from the waist down by a spinal cord injury to become the first such patient to walk without the use of robotics, doctors in Southern California reported on Wednesday. The slow, halting first steps of the 28-year-old paraplegic were documented in a preliminary study published in the British-based Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, along with a YouTube video. The feat was accomplished using a system allowing the brain to bypass the injured spinal cord and instead send messages through a computer algorithm to electrodes placed around the patient’s knees to trigger controlled leg muscle movements.

Read more

Sep 23, 2015

Animated GIF

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

The best GIFs are on Giphy.

Read more