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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 148

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — Ira Pastor — Life After Death Society Podcast

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, cosmology, cryonics, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, genetics, health

http://oddtonewfoundland.podbean.com/e/and-man-shall-live-fo…a-spastor/

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — Age Reversal — Before the First Cup – UCYTV

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, genetics, health, life extension, science, transhumanism

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyDBh1zFb48

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — School for Startups Radio

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, business, cryonics, DNA, finance, genetics, health

http://schoolforstartupsradio.com/2017/11/in_30_minutes/

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — CEO in 10 Podcast

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, business, cryonics, DNA, finance, futurism, genetics

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/lifelessonsnetwork/2017/12/08/g…io-hacking


Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — Health Professional Radio

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, business, cryonics, DNA, genetics, health, life extension, science, transhumanism

Next Generation Therapeutics for Repair of Human Organs and Tissues – Bioquark [transcript]

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — The Inner Game Of Aging Podcast

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, cryonics, DNA, genetics, health, life extension, science, transhumanism

http://innergameofaging.com/iga36

IGA036: Reverse Aging And Disease with Human Celluar Regeneration??

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — Happy and Healthy Over 40 Podcast

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, cryonics, disruptive technology, health, life extension, posthumanism, transhumanism

http://happyandhealthyover40.com/relieving-suffering-emerging-bio-technology/

Relieving Suffering Through Emerging Bio-Technology

Dec 14, 2017

2017 SRF Summer Scholars Selfie Video

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, life extension, policy

The SRF Summer Scholars Program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct biomedical research to combat diseases of aging, such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and Parkinson’s Disease. Under the guidance of a scientific mentor, each Summer Scholar is responsible for his or her own research project in such areas as genetic engineering and stem cell research. The Summer Scholars Program emphasizes development of both laboratory and communication skills to develop well-rounded future scientists, healthcare professionals, and policy makers.

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Dec 8, 2017

Scientists Have Tried First-Ever Gene Editing Directly Inside a Patient’s Body

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

In a bold first-of-its-kind experiment, scientists have edited a person’s genes directly inside living tissue in an ambitious bid to cure a man of a rare, crippling genetic disorder.

While CRISPR has broken ground in things like editing human embryos and injecting patients with genetically edited cells, this alternative technique pioneers a new real-time approach to infusing a person’s blood with a gene-editing virus.

Continue reading “Scientists Have Tried First-Ever Gene Editing Directly Inside a Patient’s Body” »

Dec 7, 2017

A Modified CRISPR Could Treat Common Diseases Without Editing DNA

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

It worked. Working with mice, they were able to reverse the disease symptoms of kidney disease, type 1 diabetes, and a form of muscular dystrophy. In the mouse with kidney disease, for example, they turned on two genes associated with kidney function and saw the kidney function improved.


The unassumingly named CRISPR/Cas9 is a technology that stands to remake the world as we know it. By allowing scientists to more easily than ever cut and paste all those As, Cs, Ts, and Gs that encode all the world’s living things, for one thing, it could one day cure many devastating diseases.

All that power, though, comes with one pretty sizable caveat: Sometimes CRISPR doesn’t work quite like we expect it to. While the scientific establishment is still embroiled in a debate over just how serious the problem is, CRISPR sometimes causes off-target effects. And for scientists doing gene editing on human patients, those mutations could wind up inadvertently causing problems like tumors or genetic disease. Yikes.

Continue reading “A Modified CRISPR Could Treat Common Diseases Without Editing DNA” »